Home | News    Wednesday 27 November 2013

Sudanese MP calls for sacking of minister of culture over music concert

November 27, 2013 (KHARTOUM) - Sudanese MP Dafa’a Allah Hassab Al-Rasool has criticised the ministry of culture and information for allowing US-based group Yes Academy to organise a music show in Khartoum on Saturday.

The concert, which brought together six well-known performers from New York and 100 Sudanese talents, featured performances of hip-hop, break dance, rap, Broadway, jazz, and traditional Sudanese music, in Khartoum’s Friendship Hall.

The event was attended by thousands of Sudanese youths of both sexes.

The lawmaker called for the minister of culture and information, Ahmed Belal Osman, to be summonsed to testify before the parliament, saying that the musical event offended the Sudanese government and its people.

The move followed calls from the Imam (prayer leader) of Khartoum’s grand mosque, Kamal Osman Rizq, who demanded Belal be sacked and face court for allowing the musical event to go ahead.

In his Friday prayer sermon, he said that the Freemasonry stands behinds such events in order to spoil the minds of youth and turn young men into “effeminates”.

The secretary of the ruling National Congress Party’s (NCP) art sector, Al-Jailani Al-Wathig, who is also a singer, stressed that the event was inconsistent with Sudanese traditions and customs.

He told Al-Ahram Al-Youm daily newspaper that he had made a strong stance against the event, saying that the Sudanese community had also denounced it.

Al-Rasool, who has been dubbed the “controversial” MP by local media, is known for his extreme views.

Last May, he demanded the parliament to adopt a motion calling for polygamy, saying that it is the only way to produce more men in society to in turn support the armed forces and defend the country against rebel groups.

In April, 2012, he led an incitement campaign against famed Egyptian singer Shereen Abdel-Wahab, who had been scheduled to perform in Khartoum’s main football stadium, describing the event as “immoral”, and calling for a general mobilisation for jihad (holy war).

As a result, Khartoum state authorities cancelled the concert, saying it would not allow such an event while army soldiers and the mujahedeen (holy fighters) remained on the battle front.

(ST)