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TEXT: Security situation in Abyei "unpredictable" - CPA panel

November 25, 2007 (KHARTOUM) — The security situation in the disputed oil rich area of Abyei remains unpredictable as the two peace partners continue to exchange accusations over military build up in the region, says a report issued by the Assessment and Evaluation Commission (AEC).

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Sudanese from Dinka tribe staged a demonstration outside the opening ceremony of the NCP-SPLM meeting on Saturday 27, 2006 in Khartoum. In the picture two demonstrators hold banner “Abyei belongs 100% to Southern Sudan”

A copy of the confidential report, obtained by Sudan Tribune, on the status of Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) implementation describes the security situation in the disputed area of Abyei as unpredictable.

According to the 63 pages report, the redeployment of SPLA forces from East Sudan and of militias in Khartoum has led to the continuous passage of soldiers and arms through Abyei. Both parties say that the other side is strengthening its military presence in Abyei, specifically around the oil-rich areas.

Also, the security situation in the area continues to be tense due to competition between the Dinka Ngok and Misseriya tribes over limited natural resources, basic services and the passage during the rainy and dry season of Misseriya people and cattle.

The report said that Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) refused to consider UN monitors to be deployed in the area north of Abyei because they believe that this area is not part of ceasefire zone. On the other side, the SPLA imposed restrictions in the area south of Abyei.

With regard to the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) redeployment of troops in Blue Nile and in South Kordofan, the report says that the SPLA continues to retain forces in these two regions. The numbers were 22,601 in Nuba Mountains and 35,330 in Southern Blue Nile. The redeployment was supposed to have been completed by 15 months into the CPA.

The SPLA is concerned that areas from which its troops have redeployed will become zones of insecurity, the AEC report said.

The findings of this report outline the mistrust that exists with regard of the establishment of the Joint Integrated Units (JIU). On top of that JIU’s lack funding for the training, remains with two separate command chains, while each JIU, in principle, has a commander chosen on a rotating basis between SAF and SPLA.

Also, the fact that a portion of SAF elements in JIUs is comprised of former SAF aligned militias or (OAGs) raises the suspicion on the SPLA side of some activities within the SAF elements of the JIUs.

The AEC report, which was issued in October 2007, pointed out that no national programme for reconciliation and healing has been established by the government of national unity.

Further, it mentions that the following bodies are not yet implemented: the National Security Council (NSC), the
National Security Service (NSS), Security Committees at the GOSS and the States level, Identification of the Security organs of the two Parties and their assets

The federal parliament enacted the law related to the Development and promotion of national languages but its council has not been formed. Also the law related to the Human rights commission is still under review by the National Assembly.

The report says that the Organization of an inclusive Constitutional Review Process has not yet started.

With regard to the compatibility of southern Sudan states constitutions, the report says that a model of State Constitution had been developed and agreed on both by the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Legal Affairs in the south.

Concerning the establishment of National Petroleum Commission (NPC), the report says that the NPC secretariat is partially functioning, but is awaiting southern Sudan government nominees. However the distribution of oil wealth between the North and South is functioning smoothly per the report.

(ST)

Below the full text of the report issued by the Assessment and Evaluation Commission :

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