Home | News    Monday 15 January 2018

Sudan continues military buildup on eastern border

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A new batch of the RSF militiamen arrive in Kassala on 14 January 2018 (ST photo)
January 14, 2018 (KHARTOUM) - Additional troops from the government militia Rapid Support Forces (RSF) have arrived in the eastern state of Kassala on Sunday.

Since 5 January, Sudan has deployed thousands of RSF fighters to Kassala on the border with Eritrea after a presidential decree declaring a state of emergency.

Following what, Sudan shut down its border with Eritrea and declared popular mobilization in Kassala saying the deployment of troops along the Eritrean border came as result of military threats from Eritrea and Egypt against the country.

According to Ashorooq TV, large crowds of residents besides the executive, legislative, political, military, civilian leaders have received the additional RSF reinforcements at the entrance of the city.

Speaking to the arriving fighters, the governor of Kassala State Adam Jama’a said the RSF is the “striking force” across the country, describing it as “safety valve” to counter any aggression against Sudan.

He said that Kassala faces a number of problems including human trafficking and commodity and illicit arms smuggling, saying the arrival of the RSF would support the state’s efforts and protect the border.

Meanwhile, Sudan’s Foreign Minister Ibrahim Ghandour said the deployment of the troops on the eastern border comes in anticipation of possible aggression that could adversely impact security.

He said that Sudan didn’t accuse a particular country of building up military forces on the border but spoke about threats to its security from the eastern border.

“We don’t speak about a specific country but we have information that some are trying to hurt us and we would disclose it in details in a timely manner,” he said.

(ST)

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  • 15 January 08:47, by Lenin Bull

    Sudan is only bullying a young weak neighbor Eritrea and the only reason is the suspected good bilateral relations Eritrea has with Arab Republic of Egypt. Sudan is full of idiots. Instead of attacking Egypt straight, Sudan is uneccessarily disturbing Eritrea. Anyway Egypt and other countries are watching and monitoring the sinister plannings of Sudan and Ethiopia.

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    • 15 January 18:52, by Habibi

      LMAO, disturbing Eritrea? we are amassing troops within our ’’own’’ borders.... who told Eritrea to accept Egyptian troops knowing full well of their disputes with Sudan and Ethiopia? how many Eritrean refugees flee to Sudan on a daily basis?

      Sudan and Ethiopia are head on challenging the historical power structure in this region, whereas you guys are doing nothing but butlicking lmao

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  • 15 January 08:52, by Lenin Bull

    WW I was caused by Germany bullying Serejevo-Bosnia Hezegovinia and WWII was caused by Germany unwarranted invasion of Poland and all these bloody WWs, Germany lost terribly. Sudan will invade Eritrea but finally in the course of the war, there will be no Sudan anymore. It will lose the war and breaks up into pieces( Darfur, Nuba, blue Nile, Beja, Dongola, etc Republics). Take care and listen.

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    • 15 January 08:59, by Khent

      Lenin

      Egypt’s opposition to Ethiopia’s hydroelectric dam is at the very heart of this stand-off; Khartoum was initially opposed to the dam but their position changed when they learned of its benefits for them. Now, Egypt is un-surprisingly a bit miffed by this, and so they seem to have deployed forces to Eritrea — prompting Khartoum’s response deployment...

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      • 15 January 09:05, by Khent

        ..Khartoum and Addis Ababa have also signed a defence pact — which may explain Eritrea’s apparent acceptance of Egyptian military presense. Khartoum is not strong enough to "bully" Eritrea. Khartoum is only able to "bully" Juba because those death-deserving traitors failed to acquire air defence systems. Close to $20 billion dollars was stolen by our mis-leaders in Juba...

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        • 15 January 18:55, by Habibi

          Khent, you make Eritrea sound like a fake Israel.... lol at not being strong enough, Eritrea is like an extension of Kasala. They have a tiny economy, their country is running out of its own people. they are a weak state that nobody cares about. The eritrean army is poorly trained and has barely any weapons to speak of. The Sudanese air force alone can finish the job

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          • 16 January 01:12, by Khent

            Habibi

            I’m not equating Eritrea with Israel but it won’t be easy for Khartoum to impose its will on it. You’re placing far too much emphasis on your air force when air power alone does not win wars. If they were so weak, Ethiopia would have destroyed them along time ago in all their wars.

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            • 16 January 03:41, by Nairobimitot

              Khen,
              Ethiopia is not willing to destroy its Neighbor Eritrea. Ethiopia will only and only destroy Eritrea if Eritrea makes a big mistake.

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            • 16 January 03:42, by Khent

              This is one of the very few times in which Khartoum is not in the wrong; if Asmara has actually allowed Egypt to deploy its forces on Eritrean soil, then it’s putting itself in an unenviable geopolitical position. Khartoum can easily defend itself against Eritrea but it’s not capable of launching a successful ground invasion on Eritrea...

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              • 16 January 03:49, by Khent

                ..The rebels in Kordofan still retain Kauda despite the numerous promises Khartoum has sent into emission since 2011 to take their headquarters, so I can’t see how Khartoum could launch successful ground operations against Eritrea; Asmara is weak, but they’re certainly stronger than the SPLM-N. It’s good to have faith in one’s own military, but let’s not go nuts.

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              • 16 January 03:50, by Nairobimitot

                Sudan will not be willing to launch a ground invasion because that is not their number one priority. The most important thing to Sudan is security. Sudan wants its borders to be stabled and free from terrorism. That is all they want.
                Eritrea has to be careful and must know that Sudan and Ethiopia are friendlier to Eritrea than Egypt. Egypt only wants to kill the development of Sudan and Ethiopia by setting up bases in Eritrea. That will not succeed at the end of the day. Sudan and Ethiopia will deal with any threats to their stability and development.

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                • 16 January 04:12, by Khent

                  Nairobi

                  It’s not just about priorities - capability comes into play. Khartoum could bomb Eritrea from the skies but I doubt that it could impose its will on the ground. We’ve seen the capabilities of the SAF on the ground, and I can’t see it invading any country in the region.

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                  • 16 January 04:16, by Nairobimitot

                    Khent
                    There is a joint military agreement by Khartoum and
                    Ethiop. So, when you talk about Khartoum, know that you are talking about Addis Ababa. They are one.

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                    • 16 January 05:27, by Khent

                      Nairobi

                      Egypt could still take both of them on - at a cost. It really depends on what Cairo would be seeking to achieve; Egypt is not strong enough to occupy either Nations for long but it could damage their infrastructure in a very petty way. If our region were not so weak, a regional military alliance would be able to temper Egypt’s arrogance...

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                      • 16 January 05:56, by Khent

                        Egypt has no right to prevent Ethiopia from using its own water resources. Egypt wanted Khartoum’s support and seems to have been under the laughable impression that Khartoum would sideline its own interests out of deference for Egypt, and when that didn’t happen they started behaving like irant infants.

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        • 16 January 00:42, by Mayendit

          Khent
          This time, I am totally agree with you because your few explanation to our Readers make sense to me. Yes, Khartoum’s government/ SAF always trying to weaken South Sudan because they knew very well that, the young nation is lacking many things in term of economic down turned, military equipment,unrest rebellions, weakness of leadership and the absent of political will and you can name it more

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    • 15 January 18:49, by Habibi

      Lenin, are we supposed to be lectured by a South Sudanese national? the same country that now is poorer and has a smaller econoy then Somalia?

      please, take a seat and don’t worry about our politics. you are too small and irrelevant to be part of this debate. Eritrea is signing its own death warrant, you focus on feeding halve your people who depend on UN aid

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  • 15 January 10:09, by James

    Leave alone Sudanese army with their jalabia and slippers, Ethiopia with all its support from US failed to defeat Eritrea. If Sudan attempts to attack Eritrea that will be the end of the regime in Khartoum and Sudan will be in chaos for the next generation

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    • 15 January 18:47, by Habibi

      LMAO Jalabia and Slippers, sounds like you are mistaking the Sudanese army to that of Eritrea. If Eritrea, a country with an economy smaller then that of Zambia, tries to attack Sudan, Afwerki would be back to cleaning houses in Khartoum LMFAO

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      • 16 January 00:16, by Mayendit

        Habibi
        Your regime have been dancing all these years even when the head of State was indicted by ICC but this time around, things are not going to favor Omar al Bashir and [NCP] National Islamic front just mark my word. Well, if the war happen thus, it would be the end of your regime for sure and they will blamed nobody but their own attitudes toward Egyptians and Eritreans people.

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      • 16 January 00:27, by Mayendit

        Habibi.
        I would like to assure you that, those machines guns which you are shown at Eastern Sudan State are just pieces of shit that will do nothing to Egyptian army remember, Egypt is a middle power while, Sudan and Ethiopia are small power. Also do not ignored Eritrean army, her country is small but their armies are too stronger than what you think. If Omar al Bashir mess up with them u,will see

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        • 16 January 00:34, by Habibi

          Egypt is undoubtly the military power ATM, but will it remain so in the next 15 years? seeing how Ethiopia is expanding and Sudan is opening up to the world, Egypts days are over. The Nile runs from South to North, soon Egypt will be hostage since we would control the Nile, its bloodline.

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          • 16 January 00:37, by Habibi

            It is good to have dreams and wish for Bashir to go, you have been doing so since ou were born. You come from the same country that prefers to commit suicide just to hurt North Sudan even though you going through so much shit. In terms of GDP, Egypt $320 bil. , SUDAN $118 bil. , Ethiopia $78 bil. while Eritrea below $10 bil..... Eritrea is nothing, with its 6 mil population it is no match

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            • 16 January 01:00, by Mayendit

              Habibi
              The war is not about who have more population instead, it is about skillful and experience. I think your concept by thinking 6 million of Eritrean will do nothing to Sudanese who have had 35 million people is absolutely wrong and the way you guys behave to your neighbors countries is also wrong. 6000 SAF were defeated by 3000 SPLA at Pan-thou and Bashir brought 25000 SAF again, defeated bad

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            • 16 January 01:27, by Khent

              Habibi

              I don’t see either Ethiopia or Sudan gaining enough economic and military power in 30 years let alone 15 to completly deny Egypt access to the Nile; they’re not going to watch on the sidelines if something that drastic was imposed on them. The morons in Juba committed "suicide" when they failed to build an alternarive pipeline during the Interim Period...

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        • 16 January 00:39, by Habibi

          Just to remind you, those pics are from Sudan RSF, not the actual army. The Sudanese army has the 5th mightiest air force in Africa and is negotiating for SU 30/35 jets and looking for S300 anti missile radars from Russia. We might need more for Egypt, but Eritrea is a joke that just our paramilitary can eat within days lmao

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          • 16 January 01:43, by Khent

            Habibi

            The Su-35 has an advanced targeting pod and would be very useful against ground targets; the rest of your inventory seems advanced in terms of hardware but it’s lacking in the software department. The Iranians (being more advanced) used their air force to great effect against us in "Heglig" when you were still aligned with Tehran...

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            • 16 January 01:47, by Khent

              As it stands Khartoum uses mortar rounds in lieu of precision guided bombs and missiles in aerial bombardment; I do have to give credit to Khartoum for actually modernising its military when Juba’s death-deserving thieves ignored this imperative during the same period. If I had my way, they would all be shot for this unforgivable failure.

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  • 16 January 00:43, by Habibi

    Very interesting to see how South Sudanese booty clap Eritrea and view it as a regional power. Not surprised seeing where south sudan itself is positioned on the ranks, below somalia, any country would be to you guys a role model.

    Eritrea has nothing, a tiny irrelevant country with no cards to play. Its so pathetic that the only time somebody cared about it was when egypt sent troops there LMFA

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    • 16 January 01:20, by Mayendit

      Mr. Habibi Please Keep Signing About South Sudan.

      Southern Sudanese people are the most warriors human being in all Eastern Africa countries even Northern Sudanese knows that.Well, if there is war in between Egypt and Sudan, make no mistake Sudan is going to break down in to many pieces of tiny nations. It would be chance for suffering Darfurian, Nubian Mt, Blue Nile and that Eastern and Dongola.

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      • 16 January 03:54, by Khent

        Mayendit

        Look, you can have all the bravery in the world but if you don’t have a Sovereign and functioning economy, a military industrial base, military academies and an air force... then it’s sort of useless. We have our mis-leaders in Juba to thank for that...

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      • 16 January 04:09, by Nairobimitot

        Mayendit
        you have a point.

        If there is any war between Sudan and Egypt, trust me, it will not be Sudan alone fighting the war. Ethiopia will also get involved, and that will balance the power and the fight about who may be winning the war at the end of the day. Sudan and Ethiopia know very well what Eritrea is doing with Egyptian troops in Eritrea. The end of the day, Egypt is going to lose.
        Also, all of you should know the real people behind the build-up of troops. The war will not be caused by Egypt, Sudan, Eritrea or Ethiopia. There are highest powers who are pressuring Egypt to disturb the development in East Africa. I want you to take gues of who are those countries and those people. They will give Egypt billions of dollars to go and attacked east African nations so that there is no development of that part of the World of Africa.
        Also, if you are from South Sudan, the war that will be fighting will affect you, and you will not see any development because if your neighbor is under attack, you are also under attack. You will not be able to see any progress in South Sudan. Who are you going to do business with and trading?

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        • 16 January 04:19, by Khent

          Nairobi

          Egypt could take Sudan within weeks if it launched a blown invasion; it has over 200 F-16s at its disposal and a large and relatively well armed army. The rebels in Kordofan and Blue Nile would take advantage of such a scenario as well. It would be devastating for Khartoum. You’re giving Khartoum far too much credit.

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          • 16 January 04:37, by Nairobimitot

            Khent
            I understand your point. But I got to tell you that Sudan is not alone in this. Sudan biggest brother is watching too. Ethiopia is watching.

            Also, there many ways and tactics to win a war and Sudan and Egypt may win the war against Egypt. I agree that Egypt has the most active military in Africa. I know very well, and also, it is possible that Egypt may lose the war if Egypt invades first.

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        • 16 January 04:42, by Mayendit

          Nairobi-mitot
          I am fully aware your concern and also I understand what you mean however, the Sudan’s government has done unusual things. They ban Egyptian products in Sudan, they recall ambassador and when he reached Khartoum, he gave speeches that shown unfriendly to Egypt. Sudan have been seen building good relations with Ethiopia against Egyptian and the Egyptians wouldn’t allowed such things.

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    • 16 January 01:55, by Khent

      Habibi

      I don’t think that South Sudanese regard Eritrea as powerful, but I do think they recognise that Eritrea has a history of holding its own against Ethiopia and so it would not be easy for Khartoum to launch ground operations into Eritrea. I’m with Ethiopia here; Eritrea deserves to be condemned for this.

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      • 16 January 03:46, by Nairobimitot

        Eritrea Cannot harm Sudan even though Sudan is fighting four internal fronts. I am not from Sudan. I am from South Sudan. Sudan is mighty militarily, and they can destroy Eritrea if they want too.

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        • 16 January 06:11, by Khent

          Nairobi

          Khartoum could target Eritrea’s critical infrastructure -civilian & military- from the air, so I suppose it could "destroy" Eritrea in that sense. Khartoum did a pretty good job modernising its military during the Interim Period. The traitors in Juba failed to do the same. It’s really inexcusable.

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      • 16 January 04:00, by Khent

        ..Our men ran out of ammunition in "Heglig" as we don’t even produce our own bullets. Salva Kiir betrayed the valor of the 3,000 men that were able to rout 15, 000 soldiers for almost 2 weeks before Iran started bombing us on the side of Khartoum, as revealed by Saudi cables...

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        • 16 January 04:02, by Khent

          The SAF has maintained heavy forces in and around Abyei and the neighbouring oil areas. As many 15,000 troops are reportedly stationed in Heglig (Sudan: Breaking the Abyei Deadlock - International Crisis Group Africa, Briefing N°47 Nairobi/Brussels, 12 October 2007)

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          • 16 January 04:04, by Khent
          • 16 January 04:14, by Nairobimitot

            Khent
            Don’t speak about South Sudan.

            We all know that South Sudan is number one went it comes to fighting. But we are not number one anymore because we are in internal struggle. If South Sudan can unite again, and build a new nation, they can chase away anybody that wants or wanted to be pursued.

            But we must unite first and stop the civil war so that we can build a robust, sophisticated army.

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            • 16 January 04:24, by Khent

              Nairobi

              That’s the point I was trying to make to Mayendit; bravery alone is not enough; security, stability, a functioning economy, an industrial military base and military academies are just some of the elementary pre-requisites that we don’t have. I have faith in our fighting spirit, but more is needed.

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  • 16 January 14:55, by Habibi

    First thing that needs to be said, some of you all are talking about Sudans internal issues. First of all the rebels, do not represent the people. just because there is a rebel force in blue nile doesn’t mean blue nile is against khartoum. the rebels in sudan, in all areas, are finished by the sudanese army. finished militarily, financially and politically both inside and outside sudan.

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    • 16 January 14:58, by Habibi

      Lhent you were talking about Irania jets in Heglig war. are you for real? what is there in the Iranian air force that is no available in the Sudanese? If anything Sudan has more Mig 29’s than Iran itself and + how on earth can Iran move its jets to Sudan just to deal with south sudan??? the story in itself is not true coming from unreliable sources. Iran had no place in th heglig war

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      • 16 January 15:01, by Habibi

        Sudan barely had any troops around Heglig during 2012 in the midst of the fights with SPLM/N and the chasing of Darfur rebels into Libya and South Sudan. the small tiny camp of 200 men is not equivalent to 15,000. That number is about a 5th of Sudans entire standing army

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        • 16 January 15:46, by Habibi

          Egypt is a standing militry power today, it won’t remain so for long. Sudanese ilitary is advancing, Sudan is opeing up to the world and we all know Ethiopias econoic success stories. A tiny irrelevant country would not stand in Sudans name. It is a country where its people are truly oppressed to the level that even its national team players seek asylum in the host countries.

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          • 16 January 15:49, by Habibi

            In Sudans way*

            Sudan can take care of Eritrea very easily. we are not talking guerilla wars that can take decades, we are talking nation vs nation where everything is a target in Eritrea. their infrastricture, government buildings, ports etc. Eritrea is now literally isolated itself from all its neighbours, Sudan was its last friend.

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            • 16 January 15:53, by Habibi

              and for what? Afwerki has literally shot himself in the leg for a pack of donuts. He has nothing, not an ecnomy, educated population or an army that can stand Sudan, let alone rest of east africa. Egypt won’t go to war with Sudan because even if they do win, Sudan would become a major headache for eternity. Egypts power is fading by the day and sooner or later it will have to give up.

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              • 16 January 15:57, by Habibi

                In terms of south sudanese, it is understandable that anything bad for Sudan is good for you guys. Even your leaders are ready to make you starve just so they can hurt the north. But if you really think about it, Sudan and Ethiopia are challenging Egypt not just for ourselves but also for the poorer countries down south that have no capacity to the same against Egypt.

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                • 16 January 16:00, by Habibi

                  If Egypt can stab North Sudan just like that even though North Sudan historically has always been on Egypts side so easily, do you really think they would treat South Sudanese better?

                  they have an agenda, they don’t care about south sudanese. or any africans. they only want a grip on the nile given to them by britain back in the days at a time when most african countries were not independent.

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                  • 16 January 16:04, by Habibi

                    Same thing for Eritrea. do you really think egyptians care about eritrea, its people or where that county is even located? is there any potential or even something to achive in Eritrea? the answer is no...

                    they only there for an agenda agaist ethiopia and of course, nobody on this earth hates ethiopians more then eritreans.

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                    • 16 January 16:08, by Habibi

                      The biggest threat to Egypt is not Israel or Libya, it is Sudan. To them, their bloodline flows through Sudan. If Sudan develops and becomes a major power, that bloodline would be taken away from them. specially with Sudans agriculture expansion, the GERD is nothing cmpared to the potential water that would be taken from egypt if mass agricultural schemes take place in Sudans deserts.

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                      • 18 January 13:33, by Khent

                        Habibi

                        Whether or not the rebels represent the Nuba or our ethnic cousins in Blue Nile is a matter I’ll just put on the back-burner for now. I can believe that the rebels have been militarily diminished, but to assert that the rebels are "finished" is absurd , especially when their headquarters have yet to be cleared despite the many promises and vows to that effect.

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                        • 18 January 13:35, by Khent

                          Am I for real? Yeah, serious like a heart-attack, mate.

                          You asked what Iran has that Sudan doesn’t:

                          The Sudanese air force does not possess the F-14 Tomcat - an aircraft that is undoubtedly more advanced than the Mig-29; it actually has a targeting pod and its ECM suite is far more capable.

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                          • 18 January 13:37, by Khent

                            I have no reason to doubt Wikileaks here; the Iranians have already demonstrated the ability to deploy air assets to Sudan using Syria as a stop-over, and they have also demonstrated the all too crucial ability to perform in-flight refueling using their KC-747 air tankers to significantly extend the range of their entire fleet of F-14 Tomcats and Migs...

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                            • 18 January 13:44, by Khent

                              ..so there is no reasonable basis to dismiss these cables — if your doubt is predicated on distance and logistics. We actually have multiple UN resolutions that were meant to deal precisely with this issue.

                              https://raseef22.com/en/politics/2016/11/08/irans-unit-190-special-force-smuggling-weapons-land-sea-air/

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                              • 18 January 13:46, by Khent

                                "Heglig" is by far the largest oifield controlled by Khartoum so it’s simply inconceivable that it would be protected by only 200 soldiers - the equivalent of an irrelevant outpost. The source I provided cites 15,000 in 2007, so I don’t see why Khartoum would reduce this to 200 at the height of a rebellion...

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                                • 18 January 13:52, by Khent

                                  ..It’s far too important for that to happen; the fact that Khartoum had 15, 000 soldiers deployed in the oilfield in 2007 speaks to its importance, and this would only be amplified in the event of an insurgency. Even Juba maintains thousands of soldiers in the oilfields in Upper Nile State.

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                                  • 18 January 13:55, by Khent

                                    Yeah, Khartoum is modernising its military but Cairo is not exactly standing still; the rate in which the SAF is modernising does not approach (let alone eclipse) the rate of Egypt’s advancement and the quality of its (large) acquisitions; Egypt’s recent acquisition of 46 Mig-35s, a squadron of Dassault Rafales and over 40 Ka-52 attack helicopters, is a case in point.

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                                    • 18 January 14:06, by Khent

                                      ..Add all that to Egypt’s current fleet of 240 F-16s and we get an understanding of just how strong Egypt is. Eritrea is now being foolish and would open itself to devastating aerial punishment in the event of a war, unless Egypt provides it with air defence systems. If that happened, the Sudanese army would be hard-pressed.

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                                      • 18 January 14:11, by Khent

                                        Sudan would not be a "head-ache" for Egypt if Cairo just decides to use its air force to target and destroy critical infrastructure. Egypt could achieve this quite easily at very minimal costs. Egypt is not "fading" faster than Sudan is ’rising’, so I’m not sure when in the proverbial tomorrow Egypt will have to "give up".

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                                        • 18 January 14:13, by Khent

                                          The North & South do each other harm, so it’s bi-directional; the transit fee Khartoum insists on is 10x in excess of the international norm and this was clearly done to hurt us. The occupation of the Lebanon size Kafia Kingi is yet another example of this, as is Khartoum’s refusal to implement the PCA ruling on Abyei.

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                                          • 18 January 14:19, by Khent

                                            Multiple rebel groups were supported by Khartoum in 2009 — which is at least 2 years before we returned the favour in 2011. I’m not sure what you think Juba has actually done to challenge Khartoum because as I see it Juba has basically accommodated Khartoum at every turn since Garang’s death. Khartoum would be easy to counter, but Juba makes them look like geniuses.

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                                            • 18 January 14:23, by Khent

                                              As for the rest of your posts about Egypt’s naked self-interested actions...I’m not the person this message should be delivered to; I’m well aware of realpolitik.

                                              The GERD is just the beginning of Ethiopia’s use of the Nile; 80% of Egypt’s water lifeline comes from Ethiopia and with 100 million people needing water, Ethiopia -not Sudan- presents the single greatest threat to Egypt.

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                                              • 18 January 14:27, by Khent

                                                Israel is still Egypt’s greatest military threat and will remain so for the foreseeable future. We know precisely what Egypt wants and that’s why we took action and prevented them from digging the Jonglei canal. These South Sudanese posters are just posturing; they don’t have any love for Egypt... they just hate the North.

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                                              • 20 January 17:38, by Habibi

                                                don’t worry, as a south sudanese there is no message I am sending to you anyways. you have far more bigger things to worry about then Sudan/Egypt spat over the nile. Sudan is the only country that can really take away Egypts water throguh farming in the deserts, not Ethiopia... so I urge you to update your politcal and geographical awareness.

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                                          • 20 January 17:40, by Habibi

                                            Its good to see that you know how man toys egypt has ATM, but do you know where your country stands right now compared to Eritrea, let alone Somalia economically?

                                            I don’t really care about Kafia Kingi, if you guys want it then take it. maybe if you agreed to split oil at 50/50 yo wouldnt be as badly hurt now, but oh well your leaders are too dumb to know anyways

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                                        • 20 January 17:31, by Habibi

                                          Sudan is also modenising its army, not as fast as egypt right now, but as Sudans economy develops its army will develop as well. Egypts influence is fading fast in the region. In year 2000 Egypts GDP was at $104 Billion, While Sudan and Ethiopia were at $12 and $8 billion respectively. on tat time it was still for times larger then us economically

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                                          • 20 January 17:33, by Habibi

                                            While today, Egypts GDP is at about $320 billion whereas Sudan and Ethiopia are at $120 ish/ $78ish respectively. The gap is narrowing fast and I wouldn’t be surprised that it will fade away in another 15 years time when Sudans GDP is hopefully reaching $270ish GDP by 2022 (IMF predictions 2017)

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                                • 20 January 17:24, by Habibi

                                  Since when were oil fields secured by armies? pretty sure the police can take care of such business hhhhhh

                                  you are still thinking like a guerilla fighter, It is absurd to think there is a need for 15,000 soldiers to secure just 1 tiny area. there is no threat that requires that much force, south sudan isn’t that huge of a threat.

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                              • 20 January 17:22, by Habibi

                                Am waiting for a reliable source, not cables that can easily be faked by third parties..... Iran had no game in Heglig

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                          • 20 January 17:20, by Habibi

                            hhhhh mate, you really believe your fairy tale stries do ya?

                            So Iran flew to Syria, bypassing saudi arabia and Jordan and Israel, then bypassing Egypt etc just to come to Sudan? I highly doubt those F14’s even fly that long lmao. Iran has no aircraft carriers either. So forget about the nnsense story of Iranian planes, Iran had no game in Heglig

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                            • 20 January 21:06, by Khent

                              Habibi

                              And you suppose that Egypt will just fold its arms and *permit* you to threaten their very survival with these farming in the desert-schemes? Do you *imagine* that Egypt will turn a blind eye during this process? Now, I see no evidence for your economic growth outstripping Egypt’s in any forecast, so those farms in the desert would be dealt with preemptively...

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                              • 20 January 21:14, by Khent

                                ..80% of Egypt’s water supply emanates from Ethiopia and it has a 100 million people that will need access to water, and so they [not you] are the biggest threat to Egypt. The only way Sudan could be a threat is if it economically and militarily surpassed Egypt and had the military strength to provide cover for a farming in the desert program that threatens Egypt’s survival...

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                                • 20 January 21:24, by Khent

                                  ..and that’s simply not going to happen. That’s a crackpot idea. You can think otherwise, but that’s inane and insane. Splitting the oil revenue 50/50 with another Nation is almost just as dumb as the myopic decision by Juba to settle at the current figure - based on the ludicrous belief that high oil prices were a permanent fixture...

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                                  • 20 January 21:36, by Khent

                                    ..The morons in Juba were strongly advised against this, even by traitors like Lam Akol. The death-deserving, murderous thieves in Juba stole close to $20 billion... and $3 billion of that could have financed an alternative pipeline during the Interim Period; that was the only smart decision, but the greed, ignorance and myopia of a small group of cockroaches prevailed.

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                                    • 20 January 22:04, by Khent

                                      The source I provided clearly outlined that Sudan stationed 15 000 troops in "Heglig" in 2007, so perhaps they were thinking like "guerilla fighters" at that point. You can reject that source as well, it’s of no concern to me. The source I provided reveals that Iran used civilian air assets to transfer weapons to Sudan...

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                                      • 20 January 22:17, by Khent

                                        ..and there’s no reason why they would have to pass through Israeli airspace to achieve that; up until recently, Iran was able to clandestinely use ostensibly civilian planes to pass through Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. As for the fighter jets; Iran can easily deploy military air assets directly to Sudan by using its air-tankers; The Iranians wouldn’t even need to go through Saudi Arabia.

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                                        • 21 January 05:57, by Khent

                                          Iran maintains extraordinarily good relations with Oman and would have no problem transferring its F-14 Tomcats and Migs through Oman. The in flight refueling guarantees Iran’s ability to traverse such distances. Aircraft carriers would be extremely useful, but the mission is very much possible without it.

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                                          • 21 January 06:13, by Khent

                                            ..But if you want to pretend that in-flight refueling is not a thing, be my guest, mate.

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  • 18 January 20:42, by Eastern

    The picture shows a FORMIDABLE FORCE; at least, I have counted about SIX ZU-23-2 auto cannons, weapons of my choice.....

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