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Sudan plans to export Nile water to Arab Gulf states: official

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June 1, 2014 (KHARTOUM) – The director of the Water Commission in the state of Khartoum Gawdat-alla Osman disclosed that they plan to export fresh water to Arab Gulf states in the future depending on the available water from the Nile River to achieve a value-added situation.

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A Saudi Arabian study last December proposed the creation of a pilot project to import water from Sudan to replenish groundwater reserves which has been depleted in the Najran region, in collaboration between the Saudi ministries of agriculture, water and electricity.

The study underscored the importance for Saudi Arabia to look at water as a global and regional problem, and activation of regional and international cooperation to resolve it by importing water in accordance with international agreements .

The imam of the al-Shohada’a mosque in Khartoum Abdul-Jalil al-Karuri suggested in the past that Sudan export Nile water to Saudi Arabia through a pipeline in return for oil.

In a related issue, Osman said that the commission pays 1 million Sudanese pound (SDG) a month to buy fuel for water supply stations.

He explained that they generate 17 million SDG in revenue of which 4 million pounds goes to electricity.

The official acknowledged their inability to carry out development projects at the moment which is the responsibility of the state.

He pointed out that the number of subscribers in 2013 reached 715,000 subscribers, noting that collecting payments of water bills through counters designed for electric bills allowed them to reach those who previously were not paying the water bill.

Osman revealed that they owe 50 million SDG in electric bills and that it has been agreed that the electricity company would deduct 5 % of the value of water bills that are collected through their outlets and apply it towards the outstanding debt .

(ST)

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  • 2 June 2014 08:08, by Jalaby

    What?!
    Sudanese government really needs first to cover those thirsty people inside the capital in Khartoum who can’t find water to drink during every summer let alone far states and rural areas in Sudan before exporting water to Gulf Arab countries!

    repondre message

    • 2 June 2014 08:14, by Jalaby

      Anyway, it would really be a good idea if we exchange water with oil with Arab rich of oil countries, we cal sell them:
      1 barrel of water = 10 barrel of oil, because water is much much valuable than oil, human can live and was living without oil but can’t really live without water, right?

      repondre message

      • 2 June 2014 08:24, by Jalaby

        My only concern that Junobean might accuse us of stealing their water when we start to export it to Arab rich countries the same way they accused us before of stealing their oil although we have many rivers such as Blue Nile,White Nile,Adbara,Rahad,Dendir,AlGash and let alone the several temporary rivers but Junobean have only one constant river (W.N) rest r temporary

        repondre message

  • 2 June 2014 09:08, by Pif Paf

    This is a good proposal. As long as Sudan is not utilizing their total share of the Nile then I don’t see the problem with exporting it. The water shortage problems in Sudan are due to a lack in infrastructure, therefore revenues from water exports should be used to solve this first. Once Sudan has developed to a stage where Water abundance is an issue then water exports can be reconsidered.

    repondre message

    • 2 June 2014 09:20, by Pif Paf

      You know one of the reasons Egypt fought Sudan hard behind the scenes throughout the years was so that Sudan did not develop, because the more Sudan developed the more Nile water we used which meant less water for them. There is no doubt Egypt will try to hamper this project and continue to resist any major development in Sudan. Egypt was and still is the biggest threat to development Sudan.

      repondre message

      • 2 June 2014 09:49, by Konan

        Well said, Egypt is Sudan no. 1 enemy.

        repondre message

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