Home | News    Tuesday 10 September 2013

Sudan seeks to boost wheat plantations to cut imports


September 9, 2013 (KHARTOUM) – The Sudanese government announced that it plans to grow 600,000 acres of wheat in order to cut the import tab for this crucial product used to make bread .

JPEG - 16.4 kb
A Sudanese farmer stands in a field of sorghum in Gezira state (AFP)

Sudan currently imports more than 2 million tonnes of wheat annually at a cost of $900 million.

The deputy director of Sudan’s agricultural bank, Salah Hassan, said that wheat plantation project will kick off in the winter season adding that fertilizers and seeds have already been made available to farmers.

Hassan went on to say that a committee was formed to develop and submit an action plan to raise productivity and underscored the government’s keenness on increasing the domestic production of wheat.

The Finance minister Ali Mahmoud Abdel-Rasool said that any delay in producing wheat locally will burden the government which will be forced to import at a higher cost due to the global increase in its prices.

“We have to reduce imports through domestic production of wheat” Abdel-Rasool said.

Last May, Sudan’s minister of agriculture, Abdel Halim Al-Mutafi, who was testifying before the parliament, acknowledged that there is a serious shortage in agricultural finance, saying that last year’s allocated funds did not exceed 2.5 billion pounds (SDG) which represents only 2% of the total loans extended by the banks nationwide.

In the same testimony he questioned the possibility of achieving self-sufficiency and poverty alleviation, explaining that Sudan’s imports of food products exceed $1 billion, while spending on agricultural activities does not exceed a mere $600 million saying he expects a grain shortage of up to 76 thousand tonnes this year.

He noted that farmers prefer to grow crops which are more profitable than wheat, adding that price of a bag of beans is three times the price of a wheat bag.

Sudan’s agricultural sector has continued to deteriorate over the years mainly as a result of negligence, drought, mismanagement, high taxes and the overall economic climate.

Sudanese farmers often complain about the high costs of imported materials such as fertilizers. Many of them were sent to jail as their debt piled up.

Several ambitious plans enacted to bring life to the sector have failed to materialize and critics say the government forfeited a golden opportunity during the oil boom to beef up agriculture.

Foreign investors also complain about lack of infrastructure and unfriendly laws which they say deters them from putting money in Sudan’s vast farmlands.


Comments on the Sudan Tribune website must abide by the following rules. Contravention of these rules will lead to the user losing their Sudan Tribune account with immediate effect.

- No inciting violence
- No inappropriate or offensive language
- No racism, tribalism or sectarianism
- No inappropriate or derogatory remarks
- No deviation from the topic of the article
- No advertising, spamming or links
- No incomprehensible comments

Due to the unprecedented amount of racist and offensive language on the site, Sudan Tribune tries to vet all comments on the site.

There is now also a limit of 400 words per comment. If you want to express yourself in more detail than this allows, please e-mail your comment as an article to comment@sudantribune.com

Kind regards,

The Sudan Tribune editorial team.

Comment on this article


The following ads are provided by Google. SudanTribune has no authority on it.

Sudan Tribune

Promote your Page too

Latest Comments & Analysis

Chemical Weapons Use in Darfur: The World walks away 2016-10-18 22:12:17 By Eric Reeves Despite overwhelming evidence of Khartoum’s use of chemical weapons in the Jebel Marra region of Darfur (western Sudan), the international community seems to be quietly walking (...)

Resources grabbing in the Nile Basin 2016-10-17 22:57:47 MISUSE, MISMANAGEMENT AND MISINVESTMENTS By Mohamed S. M. Yassin Ting Fa Margherita Chang Luca Iseppi Abstract. Historically the Nile constituted the major source of life for million of (...)

Chemical Weapons in Darfur: International action must be taken 2016-10-14 21:39:36 OPEN LETTER TO US GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND UN PERSONNEL: URGENT ACTION IN RELATION TO THE CHEMICAL ATTACKS IN DARFUR October 14, 2016 To: President Barack Obama; UN Secretary General Ban (...)


Latest Press Releases

Amnesty urges to investigate chemical weapons Sudan’s Jebel Marra 2016-10-12 12:52:01 Sudan: International chemical weapons investigation urgently needed into horrific Jebel Marra attacksAMNESTY INTERNATIONAL NEWSFLASH 11 October 2016 Sudan: International chemical weapons (...)

UNAMID JSR’s statement read to the media on peace in Darfur 2016-10-10 20:57:56 African Union United Nations Mission in Darfur Though the region of Darfur is relatively peaceful at this time, a small portion of Jebel Marra within Darfur continues to be intermittently (...)

Sudan: No justice for protester killings 2016-09-23 08:03:30 (Nairobi, September 22, 2016) – Sudanese authorities have yet to provide justice to victims of a violent crackdown on anti-austerity protesters in Khartoum in September 2013, the African Centre (...)


Copyright © 2003-2016 SudanTribune - All rights reserved.