Home | News    Tuesday 29 December 2009

South Sudan is rejecting ‘inclusive’ referendum bill

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By Philip Thon Aleu

December 28, 2009 (BOR) – South Sudan minister of legal affairs and constitutional development says the SPLM will not accept a referendum bill that allows all Sudanese to decide southerners’ fate.

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About 500 people marched in Bor town in support of referendum bill on Monday Dec. 28, 2009 (Photo by Philip Thon Aleu — ST)

Addressing people who marched against what they called ‘oppressive laws’ in Bor on Monday, Michael Makuei Lueth says the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) will welcome the bill when only southerners are legible to participant in 2011 referendum.

In 2011, a referendum will be held in South Sudan according to the 2005 peace accord that ended 2 decades of civil war between the former rebel SPLM, which now rules the semi-autonomous region, and Khartoum’s National Congress Party.

However, a law which will guide the process of referendum is not enacted after SPLM disputed a modified referendum bill on Tuesday December 22 after the NCP legislators dropped some articles agreed previously by the two parties.

The approved bill cancelled an article stipulating that southerners who reside after 1956 outside the region will have to register and vote only in South Sudan. The referendum also allows other Sudanese who are staying in the south since January 1, 1956, according to legal sources. A northerner, however, have to be screened and recommended by local chiefs about his residence in the south.

Briefing protestors in Bor on Monday, Minister Makuei Lueth warned that the CPA will be critically tested if the referendum bill is signed into law by President Omar Bashir in the form, then that will allow all Sudanese to decide southerners’ destiny. Mr. Lueth said if all southerners outside the south will participant in referendum, "this means all Sudanese are going to participant. This is inclusive and will not give correct results [of referendum."

The protest, ongoing in all southern towns on Monday, December 28, 2009 also demands that popular consultations in Nuba Mountains and referendum in Abyei should be made fairly.

The demonstrators also had banners with writing "Peace in Darfur is a necessity before 2010 elections." Some banners also say “partnership between NCP and SPLM
lies in the implementation of CPA.”

This display indicates public frustration over repeated delays in implementing the CPA. For example, referendum bill was expected in 2008. North—South border demarcation was due in the first six months of CPA but all in vain.

According to Makuei, Monday peaceful matching organized by SPLM and other political parties is also meant to inform the NCP that the National Security bill is oppressive. He says giving security agents powers to arrest rather only collecting information is against basis human rights.

(ST)

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  • 29 December 2009 04:30, by Dinka Boy

    That is great.
    We have no time to wait for the NCP garbage.
    They tried harder to fool Southern Sudan,but this is the modern time where we have governmnet that can response to any aggression from external.
    This is not Joseph Lagu ara.
    Thanks

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    • 29 December 2009 05:00, by Achiek Alier Jr

      Dinka Boy,

      I think NCP has failed to outmaneuver the SPLM in what they thought would be a Political leverage after we loss our exceptional Dr five years ago.

      But unfortunately for them, Salva Kiir is following the foot step of the man who stirred the movement to its current position. We should be proud of him and his fallen comrades brother.

      SPLM/A Oyei, Dr John Oyei, William Nyuon Oyei, Kuanyin Bol Oyei, James Hoth Oyei, Salva Kiir Oyei, James Wani Oyei, All of us Oyei. But those two Drs are excluded, Drs of deaths and failure.

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      • 29 December 2009 05:26, by Dinka Boy

        Mr Achiek,

        My whole heart is with SPLM 100% and its leaders who liberate our people from darkness.
        I am very proud to our great leaders that never step their feet to Arab governmnet because of food/bribe. I really hate traitors 100%.
        Thanks

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    • 29 December 2009 05:23, by Aduol Liet

      Mr, Michael Mahuei Lueth and Others in GOSS MP.

      We have appreciated your commitment to guide Southern Sudanese people on what will matter to us at most. Our late chairman Dr, John Garang was assuring us after signing peace agreement that, it is up to Southern Sudanese people to decide in the coming years as we are now heading actually to it. Although our people in Southern Sudan are facing all kinds of situations due to lack of liquidity in the government supports, we will not take any rest until the last day the Juba Administration made their announcement for Southern Sudan independence as a nation.

      We have been stayed united since the Sudan gained its independence in 1956, unfortunately, the killing on Southern Sudanese people does not stop. The Arab agendas which appeared against all Black African Tribes in the Sudan was still ongoing policies in the Sudan government. After the peace agreement was signed recently, many people thoughts maybe these dominators so call Arab in Sudan will change their mines and their policy However, these people now they felt sorry about Sudan government that has been heading bad or wrong direction and we Southerners Sudanese will not going to buy their dirty tactics also we are ready to gain Southern Sudan’s independence as a nation and thanks to those who show up with the SPLA Flag.

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    • 29 December 2009 06:20, by Sala Gai

      Dear Mr. president Kiir Mayardit

      Good governance and unity of the Southern Sudan is
      The interest times in South. I have therefore decided to speak to you about some of the challenges that we face and the opportunities that we have and what we can do about them.

      I. The dominant political philosophy over the last 20 years And by way of background on how we can meet the challenges, and seize the opportunities, I will first say a few words about governance and our political system. The Lagu fell in 1972 in Adis Aba Aba. Since then, discussions on politics have largely assumed as axiomatic, that the ideal political system is the Liberal Democracy as practised in the Sudan, particularly the South. Every country and political system is usually compared against that as the ideal and is graded accordingly. Most discussions in the media, and the academia, proceed on this basis.

      II. Difference between Governance and the nature of the political system

      In this intellectual environment, there has not been a lot of focus on the relationship between two different but connected ideas: (1) Governance; and (2) A political system that is capable of delivering governance.

      Good governance would mean the delivery of benefits to the people: (1) Rule of Law (2) Maximum opportunities (3) Housing (4) Economic well being (5) Healthcare (6) Safety and security (7) A civilised environment which allows the individual to be free. And so on.

      A political system is the means to deliver good governance. Often, in the past, there was not enough public understanding even now of the fact that the two concepts are different. One was merged into the other, and there was an unstated presumption that if you had the formwork of democracy, then you will get good governance.

      Much discussion which passes for political comment usually started and ended with a critique of the political system, without an adequate analysis of the need for governance. But the two concepts are different. We see increasing acknowledgement internationally, that the difference between two concepts should be understood. I have made the point elsewhere. This week, the Dr John Garang Times carried an interesting interview, with a political analyst in the time entry to Sudan Government by the agreement, who made the same point.

      iii. Political System If we agree that good governance is the goal of the Southern not you by wish of Dr John Garang, then we need to ask: can we automatically assume that the political system as developed say in the South, will also deliver good governance to all other societies?

      To answer the question, I would quote Abel Alier. He said: “The political system has to be tailored as closely to the country as a coat to a man”. Before I go on, let me make one point clear: I am not entering into the “Eastern versus Northern values” debate; nor am I making the point that Eastern societies do not value human rights.

      My point is more basic: Political systems are essentially systems for delivery of governance. And while some values are universal, nevertheless a political system will work best in a society if it is designed to fit that specific society.

      If we accept that political systems have to be tailored to suit the needs of each country, then the debate must really be on how the political system should be structured for a specific country, rather than whether the system approximates the US or UK or any other model.

      V. Southern Now let me turn to Southern. I am not going to repeat points I have made elsewhere on Southern’s exceptionalism. In essence, in my view, there is a clear difference between how interventionist and activist our Government has to be, and how the Government and the people have to act together, compared with larger and more secure countries, which can take a more laissez faire approach.

      Our size, geography and strategic situation have imposed limits on us. There are more natural resources nor any strategic space or large pool of manpower. We survive on our wits.

      To succeed we need to:

      (1) get investments into South (2) encourage local entrepreneurship (3) become a sophisticated service centre; and (4) ensure safety, security and stability.

      To achieve this: (1) We need a Government that formulates policies for the long term with the main party SPLM; (2) A talented population which can deliver world class performance; and (3) Collective effort between the Government and the people to implement the policies that have been formulated. This formulation, with its emphasis on activist Government is somewhat different from the classic laissez faire approach. I don’t think that the laissez faire approach will deliver the most optimal results for us. What does this model mean in philosophical terms? One strand of liberal theory would suggest the State can intervene to protect society from an individual. But, it should not intervene to require the individual to act in his own good or for the benefit of society. That could work if there is no real need for Government to act to ensure the survival or the economic success of the State. But would that theory hold, in a small city state which has to react quickly to externalities and which may need to mobilise the population for such action? Many other countries are not as finely balanced as us – few are as small and dependent on maximizing the opportunities in the external environment as we are. Kenya,Uganda is not a real comparison on our interest – it has a dependable hinterland. China will look after Norther Sudan due to our oil flied. With this background, on the essential need for good governance for us, I will outline a couple of external challenges.

      VI. Challenges We have several challenges. I will only mention a couple of challenges, both external. Security The first challenge I will mention is security. If you look at the map of Southern Sudan, you will see several countries which have had political instability in recent years now. Such political instability allows militancy to take root and flourish. There are also insurgencies in a number of countries. These insurgencies are long running and are based on ethnic or religious differences. These insurgencies may attract more militants to their cause. There is a risk that the militant cause could spread wider, causing even greater regional instability. They may also serve as breeding grounds for terrorists. There have also been reports of extremist groups using religious schools as a means of recruiting potential militants in some of these countries. That provides them with captive recruits.

      These threats cannot be taken lightly. So if you look at the map of Northern Sudan, the situation is not pretty. In fact it is a troubling picture. The potential for the situation to get worse and for that to spread exists, if the underlying issues that have led to the insurgencies and militancy are not tackled effectively. We do not have to be alarmist. But we must work on the basis that we could be a high profile target. And in any event we will be affected in one way or another by what happens in the region.

      Our responses cannot only be kinetic. We have to also build real bonds of trust within our society, across racial and religious lines, so that our community responds cohesively in the face of such threats. A laissez faire approach will not work, as some Western countries are finding out.

      Ministry Home Affairs Luka BIONG, Mr. Gier Chueng and the other Ministries put in a lot of effort into this and work with our people: an example of what I had earlier referred to as the need for the Government and the people to work cohesively together. We have, for example, a variety of continuous Community Engagement Programmes, to inter alia, build inter ethnic confidence.

      We have other projects as well as Legal project which are not fitting the communities need, these are the Ministry of Home Affairs. Many countries come and look at how we are doing this – and realize that what we do is worth learning from. There are also countries in the region where questions of ethnicity and religion have been raised with increasing intensity in political discourse. Our own ethnic and religious mix somewhat mirrors that of other countries in this region. Thus we have to therefore prepare our population actively, to try and ensure that there is no automatic reaction here, along ethnic or religious lines in response to events in the region. We have been doing that. Thus we have to be constantly alert because while the region is making progress, it still has serious governance issues.

      And we need to ensure that our own Governance is of the highest quality – to deal with the challenges. As a financial and services centre, servicing, inter alia, this region, we will feel the impact of events in the region. I will now deal with a second external challenge. Big Power Relationships and Interests in this region This region is of interest to major powers, including the US and China, Egypt, Arab countries. They are likely to chart a path of peaceful co-existence Unity. But at the same time, we can’t have to recognize that both countries, as well as other powers, we have interests in which may always be coincidental. The , Egypt Pacific Fleet navigates through the waters in South. The Northern has substantial economic interests in , Egypt. China’s economic and diplomatic interests are also growing rapidly. History shows that big powers will seek to influence smaller countries. And where big powers compete, their desire to influence smaller countries could sometimes be quite strong. All of this is natural. China also has claims in the Paracels and the Spratleys. Other regional countries make competing claims. Countries in this region and the regional entities (like South) have to deal with all these issues. South has to be aware of the way these issues evolve and are dealt with. And South has to be very clear about the direction it wants to take, in its own sovereign interests, in a dynamic, fast changing environment. That will require nimbleness and long range thinking. On that note, I will now turn to the opportunities.

      VII. Opportunities I have spoken about a couple of external challenges. But on balance, the opportunities in our external environment far outweigh the challenges that we face. If you combine the populations of China and South Sudan, you get nearly 2 billion people. A substantial number of this 2 billion people are hardworking, smart and want to make a better life for themselves. Thus this vast area will progress. And China will progress rapidly. That can have very positive economic consequences. Thus I am optimist about South – strongly so. We are in an unique position to be part of the progress of East and South East as well as the dynamic progress of India. We have a real opportunity to be a leading, dynamic city, servicing a region of tremendous wealth, albeit that wealth might be unevenly spread. We will not be the only city doing that, but we can be among the leading group. And we have some unique advantages that many others do not have. But to get there, we must be able to tap into these opportunities. That goes back to good Governance and cohesive society: with a clear idea of our interests, our abilities, what the opportunities are, and how we can be part of the regional growth. I will also emphasize another point, which I see as being important to our continued success – our openness to talent inflow. We have succeeded so far because we have been liberal on talent inflow. To continue to succeed, we need to continue with that policy. Businesses invest in Singapore because they know that they will be able to bring in the talent they need. The financial services sector employs several thousands of Singaporeans. It also employs many foreigners. If we told the banks that they cannot bring in foreign employees than we put the jobs of Singaporeans at risk as well. Let me illustrate with a concrete example. This week I met a BOSS of a major blue chip foreign bank. That bank employs nearly 600 people in South. Many are in high paying jobs. 100 of them are foreigners on Employment Pass.

      The other 5,000 or so are Southern or PRs. He told me that the great advantage Southern had, (for them), compared with almost any other place they operated in, was the ease with which they could bring in employees from all over the world. He told me, with some pride and satisfaction, that there are 40 different nationalities amongst his 100 foreign employees in the South Government. He considered it quite remarkable – they can bring in talent from all over the world, and these people contribute to our economy. As a result, they were confident about expanding in Singapore even during the crisis. He also expressed some concern, as to whether our policies on talent inflow will change. The debate in the newspapers about non Southern in South has obviously been noticed. What should our policy be? Should we be restrictive? 5,000 Southern and PRs get employed by the bank.

      If we had been difficult about the 100 foreigners, would not be there 5,000 Southern jobs? The number will be much smaller. In the end protectionism does not help. And the value add to the economy, from the extra business the bank does, in South, is significant as well. It grows our financial sector, thus benefiting many other Singapore businesses. If we are clear minded, we can help our financial sector grow quite well. The same in these few industries. Foreigners occupies us increase the pie – and that gives jobs to Southern.

      This is a war for talent. We have been successful in attracting talent. We must continue on that path and compete for talent. If we are not open to talent, we will quickly lose out internationally. This has become even more important in the aftermath of the financial crisis. Some countries have been forced, either by reason of their financial position, or for political reasons, to come out with policies that do not favour the attraction and retention of talent. This has been particularly so in respect of finance industry professionals. In this environment, we have stayed calm, rational and have kept to our talent and investor friendly policies. Our tax rates are sensible. We are a good, stable place with a stable financial system. If we keep to our policies, we will, in the growing Asian environment, continue to grow strongly as a financial centre , this is what I can I sure you to follow these step. We have to always remind ourselves: We do have resources. and also We want to depend on investments. Many countries compete for investments. Investors will assess where best to invest. If we make it difficult for them to hire foreign workforce, then the investors will go elsewhere. Investors are also rational. Where they can do so, they will employ Southern. We must create the right conditions for investment and must also create the right conditions for employment of South. And we have done so – as shown by the fact that through this recession, many more foreign workers lost their jobs. Singaporean jobs were saved by Government policies (like Job Credit) and the Government working together with the Unions and the Employers. Let me also share a couple of examples from the legal sector

      Within the legal services sector, the top tier of cross-border, transactional work has long been dominated by global firms, primarily of South and Southern origin. The Government had to consider whether to open up our legal sector to foreign law firms. There were serious good arguments as to why foreign firms should not be allowed to practice South law. But on balance the Government assessed that it was beneficial for South to open up, and a decision was made last year to open up. We gave out 6 Qualifying Foreign Law Practice (QFLP) licences last year 1983, to allow foreign firms to practise SPLA/SPLM law. The practice of South law may be have been necessary for the kind of work they are doing. But giving them the licences gave them buy-in within the South legal scene. They have expanded their practices here, creating more opportunities for local talent. Other non-QFLP foreign law firms, seeing our cosmopolitan outlook, have also invested in their South practices. Now there are nearly 1,000 foreign lawyers in South. Many were here before the sector was opened up. We want to be a top international legal hub.

      Opening up increases the opportunities for South lawyers, increases the technical quality of Singapore lawyers. And of course there is a whole series of downstream benefits in having 1,000 highly paid foreign professionals here. Our arbitration sector has also benefited tremendously from a new blue-ribboned Board at the South International Arbitration Centre, comprising ten members from seven different TEN State. That Board was appointed to be in this year. All of them are well-known Nationwide. If Southern wants to be an international arbitration centre, we cannot take a parochial approach.

      VIII. Conclusion Let me conclude by making four points:

      (1) One: we do face significant challenges – we should be alert to them and deal with them effectively. (2) Two: there are even more significant opportunities – we must be smart enough to seize them. (3) Three: we need good governance and a cohesive society to do both.

      My fourth point is this: In pursuit of good governance we have gone about building a system that is in some ways unique to South. That has attracted a fair degree of criticism. When criticisms are made, we should consider them carefully. We should neither assume them to be correct nor be dismissive. And there is no need to adopt a stance where we accept that all judgments passed on us must be correct. We can and should be more confident about what we have achieved. We have achieved success by not blindly following prescriptions. Let me illustrate by reference to one example. Earlier this year Parliament enacted the Public Order Act (POA). There was criticism in some of the international media – how this is a further restriction on political rights and so on.. If we had decided to be Country put detainees in cages like this, what do you think the reaction of the international media would have been? We usually get a lot of stick. Sometimes different standards are applied to our actions. We have to know that, and not expect that criticisms will be free of bias. So let’s take criticisms as par for the course, and do what we believe is right. Thank you.

      By Salah Gai De Mbior

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      • 30 December 2009 07:55, by boduop

        This is good for Bor SPLM supporters to break in to peacefull demonstrations.

        I agreed with Sale Gai when i go through his comment on good governance and political system.This is what bring corruption in to Southern Sudan Government because most of people do not know the difference and what brought corruptions in to the hearts of our politicians. I agree with you.

        Botrus Duop

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        • 30 December 2009 09:58, by Sala Gai

          Mr. Botrus Duop

          Nothing like Bor SPLM in the South exccept; the SPLM is the party that liberate the right of the Southern not triblism one; please let me correct you in that point;

          May be i can consider in an other way round; due to their leadership; they were leading the movement to ward end of the CPA;and

          Thank once more

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  • 29 December 2009 04:42, by babadit

    What are we waiting for by the way ? this is our Rights as southern sudanese to chose btn unity and seperation if the were to make it attractives for us.
    If the NCP has modified this Bill to shout their will, then the Bill might be for Northern Referendum.
    The fate of the southern Sudanese will be decided by themselves, but not Northerners.
    Let’s now declear our own independence Unilaterally

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    • 29 December 2009 04:51, by Dinka Boy

      Yes babadit, i agree with you because this Khartoum governmnet running up and down thinking that they will fool Southerners in any sort of bills,but that will not really help them at all.
      It is better for them to to be fair so that the South will choose their destiny instead of them playing the childish game.

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      • 29 December 2009 05:29, by Gatmi raan

        Hey, Dinka boy
        Now you are moving toward point brother! like it or not, declaring the South sudan independence must be and should be the only option at this point. Any body that is thinking otherwise is living in world naivettees!!!!!!

        Declare my independence now Salva or get out of the way! so the real leaders would stand up.

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        • 29 December 2009 05:36, by Dinka Boy

          Mr Gatmiraan,

          I don,t change my magnitude when telling the truth.
          Thanks for telling me that i am heading to the right direction, but i want to remind you that the independent of South was my goal ever since when i took armed in 1989.
          Second, i believed have lost again. I thought that you will head the right direction while your trabilsit keep bothering you and make you blind completely. see your direction now"Declare my independence now Salva or get out of the way! so the real leaders would stand up".Anyway, your alikes are born empty and will die empty.

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          • 29 December 2009 05:55, by Gatmi raan

            Dinka boy

            No, I meant to say that, you are moving toward the point i made weeks ago, that declaring the independence of South Sudan would be the only viable option, but, may I reminded you that you strongly disagreed with it. but also would commend you for the change of heart. that now you are supporting the unilateral declaration of our independence. and for the record Iam not and will never be a tribalist.
            God bless our fallen heroes, South Sudan shall never fogets you!!!!! because you have died defending and trying liberated her people from ever relentless and ruthless enemies. (Jallaba)

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            • 29 December 2009 06:09, by Dinka Boy

              Ramiraan,

              I want to give you apiece of advise my brother. i encouraged you to take just two minutes to review the comments that I usually made after you first read it for the first time. You always fail to understand my position. please can you refer back to my comments and check them whether iam against idepenedent of Southern Sudan.

              My friend iam not like your alikes who just support lies. that is not how i was born. I even give you example that i was supporting Southern Sudan to be separate since i took up arm in 1989. That is the route of our SPLM led by Dr John Garang de Mabior and i favor that way.
              I hope you get my point.
              Thanks

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              • 29 December 2009 07:16, by Gatmi raan

                Dinka boy
                Asserting that, am supporting lies and with no supporting evidences to backed up that ridiculous assertion is not even responding to. please refrained from that tribalistic mindset ok. I won’t enterned into not any discussion about a particular political party ideology (i.e , SPLM) which was established 1983, not as an indvidual political party , but evolved into that sort as the movement progresses. I was in Itang in 1983 five months before the SPLA/SPLM inception. I know bit more what its intial objective was. As the balance power started to shift in favour of western ideologies, and the Soviets Socialist policies becoming more aboseletes, holding onto them were like being left on the death traps. And by 1991 SPLM was left with no choice but to evolved with the new realities. the world has changed and 1983 ideologies are running out fashion fast. by 1994 , entered the Chukudum convention in which made it a bit easier for the SPLM to stayed irrelievant. 1997 KPA though its hasn’t achieved its intial objective, notheless, paved the way for the CPA, which also is effects of the events. primary candidates among those is 9/11, tragdic as it was, its has pressured the Khartoum Gov’t to accepts the peaceful settelement between the North and South, or Washington, would imposes its new power to do so.

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                • 29 December 2009 07:34, by Dinka Boy

                  Mr Ramiraan,

                  I completely fail to understand what you talking about.
                  I am really serious brother. Brothers and sisters can some one help me the intention of Ramiran in the comment that start with" Dinka boy Asserting,am------------".

                  I only get that he was in Itang 5 months before 1983!. But that is completely abig lie.Wow! Itang and Pinyago were not existing in 1983. The only existing area were Bilfam and Bunga. Can someone help this kids because he is roaming with lies that he heard when their parant converse.

                  My God! Can you help those who keep lying like these. 1983! Wow!. Even my dad who was in Khoryom with agereb battalion can not say that he was in Bilfam in 1983.
                  You desrved to be called stupid because you really aliar and i can not tollerate people like you to talk with." You was in Itang in 1983 five month before SPLM".

                  In fact, who will help our Nuer brothers if they keep telling false like this!.
                  Or are thinking that people who write on this web are lie! perhaps you think like that,but that is not.
                  I will stop here because you are born empty and will die empty with lie.

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              • 29 December 2009 07:27, by Gatmi raan

                ? Dinka boy Assertting that, am supporting lies and with no supporting evidences to backed up that ridiculous assertion is not even worth responding to. Please refrained from that tribalistic mindset ok. I won’t entered into any discussions based on a particular political party ideology (i.e , SPLM) which was established 1983, By the way, initially not as an individual political party , but evolved it self into such, as the movement progresses. I was there in Itang in 1983 five months before the SPLA/SPLM inception. I know bit more what its intial objective was. As the balance power started to shift in favour of western ideologies, And with the Soviets Socialist policies gradually becoming more aboseletes, holding onto them were like being left on the death traps. And by 1991 SPLM was left with no choice but to evolved with the new realities. the world has changed and 1983 ideologies are running out fashion fast. by 1994 , entered the Chukudum convention in which made it a bit easier for the SPLM to stayed irrelievant. 1997 KPA though its hasn’t achieved its intial objective, notheless, paved the way for the CPA, which also is effects of the events. primary candidates among those is 9/11, tragdic as it was, its has pressured the Khartoum Gov’t to accepts the peaceful settelement between the North and South, or Washington, would imposes its new power to do so.

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            • 30 December 2009 08:12, by boduop

              Dear Dinka Boy and Gatmiraan,

              Declaration of Independant is not a solution now,please you should know that when we come to the point of declaration we have to think twice otherwise we miss our path to the promised land.

              There are steps that need to be considered,i know why people break in to Declaration this is because we are frustrated yes but let us wait the results of elections.
              Without elections the Declaration of Independant will not be effective according to CPA if elections do not take place.

              Botrus Duop.

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      • 29 December 2009 09:40, by Daddy pading

        Dear readers,
        it has been our interest to declare our independence as south Sudanese, however, there are some blink spot we could clearly see. We need to be caution about declaring south Sudan as independent state because NCP might be pushing us to declaring our independence probably for two reasons.
        First, CPA is being watch by international community, to see who would directly violent the CPA to sake the blamed for the casualties.
        2ND NCP thought that there is no strong leader like Dr John Garang and therefore they are pushing Southerners to declaring their independence and then weighing war against them hoping for defeat. All these two reasons are what matter our leaders don’t want to declare south Sudan as independent State. I know almost all of us young people are educationally/ politically new born babies who do not understand why people are sleeping night time instead of day time. We don’t see what is behind the politic instead we run to blame our leaders for not declaring south as independent state. We are easily excited age. Please think wisely.

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        • 29 December 2009 13:17, by Daniel Juol Nhomngek Geech

          You are right and I am happy for your proposal please keep up with that spirit to teach those who turn this website into their abusing ground.

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        • 30 December 2009 08:23, by boduop

          Dear Daddy pading,

          Yes, if NCP is not trying its best to resolve the outstanding issues with SPLM then we have to sensitise International community and IGAD to recognise our Independance.Am not against it but CPA is a constitution and am abide by it.
          NCP is very clear that it will not sign secession in to Law
          but this is what they mean? No,they are lying and they will sign it into law.

          Boduop

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  • 29 December 2009 05:35, by oshay

    Primitive Dinka Cattle Keepers SHOULD NOT have a say on the fate of the 10th largest country in the world.

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    • 29 December 2009 05:50, by SPLA

      oshay,

      If it was not those "primitive Dinka Cattle Keeper" you would still be a slave now in the 10 largerst country despite your bright thinking.

      You should be thinking Dinkas for the endurance, fortitude and perseverance they shown Arab and their militia allies during the war.

      Mr. SPLA

      repondre message

      • 29 December 2009 13:23, by Daniel Juol Nhomngek Geech

        Mr SPLA, I am glad that you hit the nail on the top.This person call Oshay does not know anything, he has deceived himself that he is educated but his head is as empty as the road from Tonj to Wau. He called Dinka primitive, but he is the one who is primitive because he writing primitively.

        repondre message

    • 29 December 2009 13:12, by Daniel Juol Nhomngek Geech

      Do not call them primitive, it is you who is primitive because you do not acknowledge the contribution that you called primitive Dinka cattle keepers have given to what you called 10th largest country in the world. Without them, the Arabs can even urinate on you while pretending that you are not a Sudanese. If I may guest, you might have been hiding somewhere during the war, leaving Dinkas to the fire of Arabs but today you make yourself somebody. Shame on you!!! You are just an illiterate buffoon and a simpleton.

      repondre message

    • 1 January 2010 19:58, by Daddy pading

      Oshay,

      Before you referring Dinka as primitive, let us first know your tribe and thereby, we will analyze the two communities ( Dinka and your tribe) by comparing their accomplishment and education in the Sudan and then their prehistory of deed would tell which one is primitive community.
      Osay, don’t feel shame to tell us your tribe even if you think your tribe would not be equal to Dinka in any way.
      NB: It is inappropriate to refer to the whole community as primitive when you are smart person.

      repondre message

  • 29 December 2009 07:50, by M.Cool.J

    Makuei!

    You have tried please and if you only mean what ever you mentioned,it will make your speech real and I will always praise you.

    The "red man" has been seriously planning to make CPA not to function,but we don’t see! so it is a good thing to have somebody like you see all this.Keep it up!

    repondre message

    • 29 December 2009 08:13, by Dinka Boy

      Mr Ramiraan,

      I completely fail to understand what you talking about. I am really serious brother. Brothers and sisters can some one help me the intention of Ramiran in the comment that start with" Dinka boy Asserting,am------------".

      I only get that he was in Itang 5 months before 1983!. But that is completely abig lie.Wow! Itang and Pinyago were not existing in 1983. The only existing area were Bilfam and Bunga. Can someone help this kids because he is roaming with lies that he heard when their parant converse.

      My God! Can you help those who keep lying like these. 1983! Wow!. Even my dad who was in Khoryom with agereb battalion can not say that he was in Bilfam in 1983. You desrved to be called stupid because you really aliar and i can not tollerate people like you to talk with." You was in Itang in 1983 five month before SPLM".

      In fact, who will help our Nuer brothers if they keep telling false like this!. Or are thinking that people who write on this web are lie! perhaps you think like that,but that is not. I will stop here because you are born empty and will die empty with lie.

      repondre message

      • 29 December 2009 10:10, by Daddy pading

        Dinka boy,
        Ramiraan, is not lying. Itang is his home land. He is an Ethiopia. He nationalized himself to sudan just for the sake of ration at Itang during the sudan civil war and that it.

        repondre message

  • 29 December 2009 08:00, by actiongatkuoth

    happy chrsm to you all.
    thatis so great southern sudanese leader keep it up

    repondre message

    • 29 December 2009 08:22, by Mel mosa

      Dear all

      The so call NCP are smart. They don’t want election in Sudan that is why they keep people busy with referendun bill, but later they will accept the referendum bill according to how Southerners need it. So, they want to secure the postphonement of election in order to stay in power when the South separate from North.

      Mosa

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  • 29 December 2009 13:00, by Daniel Juol Nhomngek Geech

    ALL THE SOUTHERNERS SHOULD FLY TO ARMS IF NCP IS TRYING TO SLAUGHTER THE REFERENDUM LAW.
    I am enraged, annoyed, infuriated and burnt with anger at what the NCP is planning to do with the southern Sudan referendum in 2011. It is an abominable and an immoral act to come up with the so-called"Inclusive Bill." Who was fighting war in Sudan were they all Sudanese or was south against the north? Southerners should carry out referendum alone.

    SPLM will have let down the people of the south if it will ever accept such cruel and inhuman bill. We are ready to fight for our destiny and if the NCP refuses to accept the bill which will let southerners to vote for referendum alone, then they should fly to arms.

    Daniel Juol Nhomngek Geech.

    repondre message

    • 29 December 2009 15:33, by Marial Mangar Akol

      Hellow brothers and sisters,
      They are wasting our time now but it is mustcase to pass the referendum bill likewise sepereation of southern Sudan.
      We are ready for any case otherwise paas it today.

      repondre message

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