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Police clamp down on youth protesters in Sudan amid reports of student death

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January 30, 2011 – (KHARTOUM) – Hundreds of young Sudanese demonstrators have been beaten and dozens arrested by security forces during sporadic protests in the capital Khartoum and other towns, in the first day of anti-government protests planned by youth inspired by the events in Tunisia and Egypt.

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A group of Sudanese youth demonstrate in downtown Khartoum on 30 January 2011 (Facebook)

The contagion of mass anti-government protests has spread from Tunisia, where weeks of protests ended the 23-year rule of President Ben Ali, to Egypt, where six days of unrest are shaking the rule of President Hosni Mubarak.

North Sudan, which stands to lose billions of dollars in oil revenues as a result of the secession of the south, faces a deep economic crisis as prices of basic commodities continue to soar. Sudan was forced to devaluate its currency to prevent it from sliding further against the dollar.

For the past few days Sudanese youth have been using Facebook and other online media outlets to create support and awareness of their planned protest, which started on Sunday around three universities in Khartoum as well as Wad Medani, the capital of Sudan’s agriculture heartland of Al-Jazzirah and in Al-Obeid, the provincial capital of North Kordofan State.

The protesting youth took to the streets chanting slogans against rising prices of basic commodities and calling for President Omar Hassan al-Bashir to step down.

The police used teargas and batons to break up the demonstrators, and arrested dozens in the process.

A statement released by the Sudanese police on Sunday said its forces had contained a “limited riot” staged by some students including some “agitators.” According to the police release, 40 students and 30 citizens were arrested. The police said that all students were released on bail.

There are unconfirmed reports that one student, named as Mohamed Abdel Rahman of Omdurman Ahlia University, died at the hospital hours later as a result of injuries he sustained during the clashes.

Sudanese authorities have zero-tolerance for protests, public gatherings of political nature are banned under the law and obtaining permission for protests is limited to pro-government protests.

A senior member of the ruling National Congress Party (NCP), Kamal Ubayd, said that the protests, which he described as limited and weak, were merely an attempt by some opposition parties to embarrass each other.

Youth groups organizing the protest released a statement saying they intend to stage more demonstrations on February 3.

Meanwhile, the alliance of opposition forces has launched a scathing criticism of the government’s forces for arresting protestors, blaming the government for the secession of the south and worsening economic conditions.

The leading member of the alliance, Mubarak al-Fadil Al-Mahdi, demanded that President al-Bashir tender his resignation immediately and make arrangements for a transitional government in order to save the country from further degeneration.

The use of excessive force against protestors has elicited condemnation from several civil and political organizations.

Yasir Arman, the leader of the SPLM’s northern sector, said that the brutal manner in which the police and security dealt with today’s protest was “a breach of the constitution, human rights and mores of our society.”

Arman called for the release of all the detainees, including Islamist opposition leader Hassan Al-Turabi. He also said the government should reverse the recent increases in prices.

The Association of Darfur Lawyers also denounced the use of unjustified violence and grave violations against citizens, demanding the immediate release of the detainees.

A number of journalists were also arrested while covering the protests. According to a release by the Network of Sudanese Journalists seven journalists were taken into custody.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj5-Z9EkgTo&feature=player_embedded

(ST)

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  • 31 January 2011 08:53, by Sam.Eto

    Tunis, Egypt—is Sudan Next?

    A Tunisian who works for the moderate Islamist channel Al Wihar met me yesterday and said: “Sudan is next, but not in the same manner.” Several Sudanese opposition writers and politicians have also predicted a Tunisian or Egyptian style uprising in Sudan. Let us consider the causes of unrest and see if they fit the situation in Sudan.

    British and U.S. responses to events in Egypt are wide of the mark. Two examples illustrate this. The highly respectable newspaper The Guardian enumerated in an editorial (27 January) the grievances of the protesters ” … sparked by self-immolation, unemployment and high food prices.” What the editorial leaves out is equally important: it is kowtowing to the West and Israel. It was most insensitive to force the Egyptians to engage in the siege of Gaza at a time in which US and British officials denounced the Israeli attack on the Flotilla carrying aid.

    The U.S. Huffington Post provides another example. Marcus Baram wrote (29 January) that People in Egypt were disappointed in President Obama, especially in the wake of his June 2009 Cairo speech. He cited very relevant U.S. controversial policies like cutting funding for democracy and governance as well as funding for civil society and NGOs in Egypt. Like The Guardian’s Editorial, he left out the very significant factor in which U.S. policy “blinked first” and backtracked when confronted by far right Israeli intransigence in settlement building that contradicts the US drawn road map and commitment to a two states solution to the conflict.

    To support Israel without” tough love “conditions undermines the claim that the West is serious about Human Rights. To embrace what Uri Davis called ”Apartheid Israel” in his book with the same title, and force Arab allies to do the same even when the face of Israel is Lieberman/Netenyahu, is to endanger Western interest, weaken moderates in Arab /Muslim countries and doom rulers who comply to isolation and violent uprisings like what we see in Egypt and Tunisia. By comparison, President Bashir is seen in his own country and wider afield as a national leader who is unfairly vilified and targeted by the West. Mahmoud Mamadani and other experts have documented the direct link between the Israel lobby in the USA and organisations like Save Darfur Coalition that led a blinkered, well funded and orchestrated campaign. The campaign ended in a farcical ICC indictment by an unaccountable unelected prosecutor whose court is not recognised by three UNSC members (the U.S., China and Russia). The same UNSC which authorised the ICC to investigate a state which is not party to the Rome Statute that created the court! On the other hand, Bashir’s position on the Middle East conflict is quite reasonable and consistent. Peace with Israel is possible if Israel accepted the Arab League offer that is on the table since 2002. The recently published Palestine Papers show that Israel is not interested in a return to 1967 borders. Its strategy seems to be continued occupation, continued land grabs until the Red-Indianisation of the Palestinians is complete and they are left with some “reservations” that salve the conscience of the West. Indeed, one can claim that Bashir’s relations with the West are an example of success for “soft power” and realistic policies. The CPA stipulated Democratic Transformation that took place and brought about an environment of openness without parallel in neighbouring countries. There are no political prisoners in Sudan. All political parties (including the Communist Party) are legally active with headquarters and publications. There are tens of newspapers, magazines, TV channels and (U.S. funded) civil society organisations. Elections have taken place and the Southern Sudan self-determination referendum was carried out in an orderly and credible manner. Enough Project warnings and predictions were proven wrong, again. Bashir’s speech in Juba on 4 January was a lesson in statesmanship meant to pave the way for a peaceful and friendly relationship with the expected break-away state. Many in the west do not recognise the significance of the 1999 split among the Islamists that resulted in Bashir ousting his previous mentor Turabi. It was not just a “palace coup”. It signified a shift from Turabi’s international project to a new modest National project. Turabi wanted a Sudan that confronts the West, meddles in neighbours’ affairs and aspires to lead all Arabs and Muslims from Khartoum. The alternative which triumphed is a Sudanese project prioritising peace in the South (later Darfur), development and good relations regionally and internationally. Instead of Jihad against the South, the CPA and self-determination. Instead of confrontation with the West, cooperation in the war on terror and democratic transformation.

    Some professional full- time enemies of peace and stability in Sudan still portray Bashir’s regime in the light of Turabi’s actions and ambitions. Promises to lift the name of Sudan from the state sponsors of terror list were not honoured. Firm promises by the international community during the Oslo 2005 conference to help rebuild the South were also not honoured.

    Will the Sudan undergo a violent intifada similar to the Tunisian or Egyptian uprisings? That is highly unlikely, for the following reasons:

    1- Uprisings happen as a result of suppression. The democratic transformation brought about by the Western brokered CPA has removed this factor. The group with the ability to revolt, the SPLM/A is an ally of Bashir and his NCP. Pagan Amum, the most provocative and anti-northern SPLM secretary general told a press conference in Khartoum last December that ”having a steady government in the north and south will contribute positively to ensure security and development.” He argued against change of government in the north.

    2- Uprisings happen against docile leaders who ingratiate themselves to the West and put its interests above national dignity. Bashir was never groomed by the West which (as the Palestine Papers show) gives itself the right to choose leaders and depose others, even if they win elections!

    3- The alternative leaders to Bashir have been tried before. They have no credibility and are too old to represent a long term choice. Sadiq alMahdi became prime Minister twice and failed twice. A decent and generous man (he invited me and our family to a reception at his residence when I returned to Khartoum) but an inadequate leader. Mohamed Ibrahim Nugud, leader of the Communist Party – which refused to change its name after the collapse of the USSR – is a political ghost from the past, with negligible popular support. The Unionists are no longer a coherent party. They are held together by the Khatmiyya sect’s leader alone. Turabi is 100% discredited because of what he did in the early 1990s when he was the de facto ruler.

    4- Before declaring austerity measures; Bashir’s government consulted trade Unions and declared a 40% rise in pay. Exemptions were made for fares in public transport.

    5- Bashir leads a National Unity Government and has started negotiations to co-opt more parties.

    The present writer opposed Turabi’s international project, but together with many others, accepted the Western-brokered CPA that stipulated democratic transformation. By so doing it saved the government in Khartoum from the conditions that would have made the country ripe for an uprising.

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    • 31 January 2011 09:22, by Peter Mading

      Dear my friend Sam Eto;
      Yours is not a comment. It is just a report pasted or intended article. Please you could write yours alone. What can you comment here in this article?
      For Instance, my comment to this article is either to oppose the demonstration or protest or support it.

      I was a strong opposer of the North Congress People before the South decided their Destiny in a referendum. Now South Sudan has conducted their referendum that determine their destiny (Separation).

      It is a high time to tell the North that if you support wrong treatment it will be done unto you.

      I support the police, the Government of Bashir to torture and arrest you if you are not loyal to his Government so that you feel the same pain South Sudan has undergone through.

      Mr. President if that was the cause of firing the Head of Khartuom University than Sack other heads of Universities in Khartuom. Let their be no Education in the North. These people(your people) were the one who misled you to mistreat the South until the South Break away and now they blame you.

      Teach them a lesson they will not forget.

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      • 31 January 2011 10:11, by mafi

        Wow. Peter, that was hateful and hurtful. Did you consider that a lot of us in the North never agreed with the marginalization of the South? Have you considered that some of us felt that it is the South’s right to have a better future that our governments have consistently failed to secure?

        Why all the hate? As a Northern Sudanese, I never wished you harm. I only hope that you would not blacken your heart with hate which can only destroy you.. hate has a funny way of coming back to haunt you.

        The NCP and all other Islamist movements in the North have been in large responsible for making a united Sudan an impossibility. I’m happy that you are finally free to decide on your own future. I even find comments from the Sudanese government on how the South is bound to fail to govern itself to be in poor taste and irresponsible.

        All I’m saying is, we love you and wish you well.

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        • 31 January 2011 10:47, by Southern_Stocker

          A very wise respond.

          I think no need for the hate comments.. we are all citizens and we all experience marginalization at different levels. I can attest to the fact that When southerns were suffering in the North Some northerners did lended their hands for help.... and history can tell.. there is no need for negative expression....May be our exedus will clarify and create a common enemy for the remaining northerners who are marginalized as well....I totally agree that some or the majority or northerns also suffermarginalization....in many aspect of life in Sudan.

          Please wait and see for our newly undeclared nation and pray that our tribal minded conduct wont rob us out to darkness....Lets stop thinking that we are safe and free, because we are only safe and free when we think as human and as a citize3n of South Sudan who has suffere equl marginalization as any other who claim....

          Shame on those who blame their suffering on other Sudanese Citizens.

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        • 31 January 2011 12:34, by Peter Mading

          Mafi;
          You know my comment is not hatred. It is my feeling that i have been made to suffer when God has not planned for me. But because of your policy of Hakuna in hypocritic manner you talk about the south which you contribute words and not by doing. North had taken everything for their Developmet leaving the South to perish. These raminant of the South will consolidate and write the History of Marginalisation and arabization. You will come and look for consultancy from the South if it comes to setting up strategies for Liberation from harmful and parasitic Government. Therefore, i do not have any feeling of hatred in my heart but am in deep pain.

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        • 31 January 2011 13:55, by Sudani Logik

          Not all southerners are narrow minded like Peter, however you must understand that his frustration and hate stems from oppressive marginalization at the hands of those who claim to represent the north (Arab/ Muslims).

          Moreover, is that the northern populace never really showed much interest in the oppression of the south (African Sudanese in general) nor were they vocal in their condemnation of the atrocities committed in the south by successive ruling elites, many preferred to enjoy the privileges afforded to them at the expense of the marginalized non-Arab/ Muslim Sudanese. In fact many were/ are more vocal about atrocities taking place in Gaza and the West Bank than the South. Perhaps you should think about that and understand that Peter’s narrow minded view of Northerners stems from their own action or lack thereof.

          Sam

          Bashir was and still is a tyrant, no amount of attempted justification on your side will change the facts on the ground, one could waste his time and offset most of your argument as to why Bashir is different to Mubarak but it would probably be a waste of time since you’re a blind loyalist. If you sympathize with the oppression of Palestinians, how on earth could you not empathize with the suffering of your own African brothers in Sudan?

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          • 31 January 2011 14:03, by mafi

            Dear Sudani Logik,

            You are absolutely right and I cannot argue against any of what you have said. There is no excuse any Northerner can have to justify the implicit acceptance of the horrors the Southerners have endured.

            While I read your response, I immediately wanted to respond with, "well, the Northerners were not exactly enjoying riches", until you made your point about Palestinian support.

            Southern frustration is understandable. I just wish that instead of directing energy on hating the North, it would be used to build a new nation. And maybe.. maybe, we can be good neighbors with mutual respect.

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      • 31 January 2011 10:45, by gais juvan

        Dear Peter,
        I think you right to advise Sam Eto, Comments are not stories, or articles. what sam copy and paste in this commentry part is not what is required, i wish sudan tribune shouldn’t display.
        Let’s learn to give comments friends.
        Sam! your first question is what is wanted, if you don’t mind. "Is sudan Next" that the only thing you wrote in this comment space.

        you better improve.
        BUT Is it your own article????. You may be arrested for having copy and paste someone article. Take care!!!

        Juvan
        Trier

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    • 31 January 2011 11:08, by Observer

      Sam Eto

      There you go again copying and pasting someone elses writings on here under your name.

      Have you no original thoughts or opinions that you have to keep stealing other peoples for your own?

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    • 31 January 2011 12:15, by australian

      Sam Eto: What a load of nonsense.

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      • 31 January 2011 12:42, by Victory

        Sam eto,

        Please stop lecturing us here on this site, this is not a universtiy debat but a political,let your commet be short & sweet.

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    • 31 January 2011 16:47, by Paul Ongee

      Sam.Eto,

      This article is biased and written by NCP journalist only to influence public opinion not to worry about potential development of political instability in Sudan especially after July 9, 2011.

      "A Tunisian who works for the moderate Islamist channel Al-Wihar met me yesterday and said: “Sudan is next, but not in the same manner.” Several Sudanese opposition writers and politicians have also predicted a Tunisian or Egyptian style uprising in Sudan. Let us consider the causes of unrest and see if they fit the situation in Sudan."

      In essence, the causes of unrest fit the situation in Sudan because of the following:

      a) Economic situation is getting worse as a result of continued rising food and oil prices.

      b) The political system in Sudan is entirely based on subjective competitive interpretation of Quran to make/amend laws, dictate, marginalize, discriminate against, detain with/out trial, torture and even hang/kill opponents at one’s disposal.

      c) Absence of democratic institutions and lack of term limit on governance is replaced by competitive political influence for maintaining political power.

      d) Since most Arab countries lack proper democratic system for recycling political power, violent uprising has become a traditional mechanism to overthrow regime deemed dictatorial.

      e) University graduates and youth constitutes over 75% and are unemployed but still miserably struggling to make the ends meet on daily basis.

      f) Freedom forces are gaining momentum prompted by the separation of South Sudan.

      g) The number of violent Islamic extremists is on the rise since virgins/bachelors are waiting for them in heavens.

      Sam.Eto add some more on the list, please.

      Paul Ongee
      Khartoum, Sudan

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    • 31 January 2011 16:48, by Paul Ongee

      Sam.Eto,

      This article is biased and written by NCP journalist only to influence public opinion not to worry about potential development of political instability in Sudan especially after July 9, 2011.

      "A Tunisian who works for the moderate Islamist channel Al-Wihar met me yesterday and said: “Sudan is next, but not in the same manner.” Several Sudanese opposition writers and politicians have also predicted a Tunisian or Egyptian style uprising in Sudan. Let us consider the causes of unrest and see if they fit the situation in Sudan."

      In essence, the causes of unrest fit the situation in Sudan because of the following:

      a) Economic situation is getting worse as a result of continued rising food and oil prices.

      b) The political system in Sudan is entirely based on subjective competitive interpretation of Quran to make/amend laws, dictate, marginalize, discriminate against, detain with/out trial, torture and even hang/kill opponents at one’s disposal.

      c) Absence of democratic institutions and lack of term limit on governance is replaced by competitive political influence for maintaining political power.

      d) Since most Arab countries lack proper democratic system for recycling political power, violent uprising has become a traditional mechanism to overthrow regime deemed dictatorial.

      e) University graduates and youth constitutes over 75% and are unemployed but still miserably struggling to make the ends meet on daily basis.

      f) Freedom forces are gaining momentum prompted by the separation of South Sudan.

      g) The number of violent Islamic extremists is on the rise since virgins/bachelors are waiting for them in heavens.

      Sam.Eto add some more on the list, please.

      Paul Ongee
      Khartoum, Sudan

      repondre message

    • 31 January 2011 22:51, by Nyachebe

      Bol Deng and Alliance:

      I always look down on your comments since you have nothing in common with me dude!
      What we are pointing out at this moment is something your upcoming children with no tribal brains will enjoy. I am an academia and living at an utmost life style, but loved to see those in the grass root benefiting with equal fashion of life.

      When I said ‘Dinka’, are not all of them since even in Bhargazel those of Malual Giirnyang, Tuchmayardit and other have been misrepresented as well as segregated from the system.

      Having said that, Dinka will not finish Nuer and Nuer will not finish Dinka. All we need is to build a clear ‘roadmap’ where all the good models are assembled together and the wrong ones are discarded.

      Imagined, a Nuer or an Equatoria man come to power one day and do some reprisal to your kids for all the evils ‘Dinka’ have committed, that couldn’t be fair to me, right?

      Please don’t encourage this move hence its flashback is gruesome. If you carefully study the main cause of civil wars in Africa are ignited by tribal dominancy, corruption and favouritism. A nation conceived through tribal dominant tends not to develop steady and falls into many crises. Any badly started government lives in coups and corruption, and revenge is the course of the morning break.

      Prove these points at Rwanda, Ethiopia, Somalia, and Uganda and add some….across Africa continent. We are not just crying or sobbing to bypass the day, but yeaning for the freedom and the sake of next generations. This is the reason why we need everything to start with good governance, strong faith and brotherly spirit.

      What had happened fifty, twenty or six years a go are gone cases and parts of the history to refer to, therefore; let’s all open a new chapter where tranquility and equality are the theme of this new country.

      South Sudan Oyeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

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  • 31 January 2011 16:38, by Paul Ongee

    Sam.Eto,

    This article is biased and written only to influence public opinion not to worry about potential development of political instability in Sudan especially after July 9, 2011.

    "A Tunisian who works for the moderate Islamist channel Al Wihar met me yesterday and said: “Sudan is next, but not in the same manner.” Several Sudanese opposition writers and politicians have also predicted a Tunisian or Egyptian style uprising in Sudan. Let us consider the causes of unrest and see if they fit the situation in Sudan."

    In essence, the causes of unrest fit the situation in Sudan because of the following:

    a) Economic situation is getting worse as a result of continued rising food and oil prices.

    b) The political system in Sudan is entirely based on subjective competitive interpretation of Quran to make/amend laws, dictate, marginalize, discriminate against, detain with/out trial, torture and even hang/kill opponents at one’s disposal.

    c) Absence of democratic institutions and lack of term limit on governance is replaced by competitive political influence for maintaining political power.

    d) Since most Arab countries lack proper democratic system for recycling power, violent uprising has become a traditional mechanism to overthrow regime deemed dictatorial.

    e) University graduates and youth constitutes over 75% and are unemployed but still miserably struggling to make the ends meet on daily basis.

    f) Freedom forces are gaining momentum prompted by the separation of South Sudan.

    g) The number of violent Islamic extremists are on the rise since virgins/bachelors are waiting for them in heavens.

    Sam.Eto add some more on the list, please.

    Paul Ongee
    Khartoum, Sudan

    repondre message

  • 1 February 2011 01:58, by J G kuol

    Bravo Sheikh Ito,what a fantastic commentary! It’s like a new born baby,and by newborn you mean born out of uterus.
    You deserve the trophies of junkies baloneys and a noble price of a broad daylight plagiarism.
    Thank you for
    keeping us informed,and keep up the hardwork.well,I just spilled my tea laughing at Ito’s dishonest righteousness.
    Back to topic: facebook movement ,the youth or whatever they call themselves.This is not about high prices, poor services, unemployment,or democratic social reforms;its about the music ,the poem,the poetry,the jihadi-litereasure islamic civilization project,the lord’s curriculum
    > This is a Umma of poetry and rhetoric,they want to see
    > Albashir on tv like before,calling for liberation of el
    agsa and holding up the banner of Allah until the calling
    of Azan is heard in the white house in USA.
    > These lunatics need someone like Hajaj bin Yusuf and so
    > was Saddam.You abuse them they respect you,you respect
    them they throw their shoes on you.
    > They should look into their history,and see how moderate
    rulers were assasinated,and how butchery rulers were praised
    and respected.
    > The rulers of the Umma always have an advantage of declaring the opposition as misguided outsiders off the path of Allah and then treat them accordingly with destructive tools available

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  • 1 February 2011 08:42, by AAMA

    First of all, may Almighty God forgive and rest the soul of Mohamed Abdel Rahman, the first defenseless martyr in these protests and help his family and friends cope with his loss. Coming to the protest, it was very clear that the NCP was very aware of the growing hate of the people for the system and the reasons are known and many. The reaction of the police and hidden security forces showed that they were expecting a battle with protestor (a scared cat always attacks first). And despite the fact that they managed to clamp down the people, this has proven to be the start of the nightmare for them. I personally think they will start to change the way they speak to the nation before its too late for them, however, the damage is done in Sudan and its irreversible and nothing can put down the fire in the people’s hearts rather than toppling this dictatorship.

    The only problem I see facing these protests is that it will take some time and several attempts to be able to produce fruitful results and this is because these protests are currently organized by the youth elite if we can say so (youth who have internet access and are open to what is happening in the world and usually represents university students). So, unless the message is passed to the commoners in the community and you start to see the whole spectrum of the society joining the protests, they will still be clamped down. So, a few more protests with the help of international media would serve that cause a lot. Unfortunately for Sudan, Egypt is covering up the media those days and the west is busy with the consequences of losing an ally in the region and how to solve this dilemma, while the Egyptian people started to see the results of their struggle.

    The problem with Sudan is that the people were clinically dead when it comes to political participation and self expression in the country for so long. This is due to years of oppression by the NIF/NCP through killing protestors, controlling the civil society bodies, ghost houses and political intimidation through harsh warnings to the people (people have to know that this regime is worse than the one in Tunisia and Egypt), however, I see a spark of hope because everybody in the country seemed to reach a conclusion that these people have to go and they can never be trusted again, but the only problem is that people are still very fearful from the regime (fear sickness have been engraved in their minds all these years). These demonstrations are aimed to bring the life back to the society and to cure the fear syndrome and be positive about our country and prevent its dissolution). And, if the will is strong and these demonstrations continue, they will succeed but not in the same way as in Tunisia or Egypt because this regime is more brutal but at the same time is very weak from the inside (they cannot hold on to power like Mubarak now if the people reached the current egyptian stage of protests).

    Peace.

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    • 1 February 2011 10:47, by Deng E. Manyuon

      AAMA

      Most successful and fruitful popular uprisings in Sudan were carried out or led by the students. Sudanese students’ movement is one of the most strongest movements in the world. I can document the sudents’ movement in 1960s. Martyr Tah Al-guroshi was the symbol of that movement.

      Despite the hardship and worse living condition, the NCP has managed to use the golden card of Islamism. Students are confused whether to abondon or follow those who proclaim good practices of Islam. The question which comes to mind is: should we challenge Islam? Because the system itself in Khartoum represents Islam.

      Deng

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      • 1 February 2011 12:07, by AAMA

        Deng,

        I agree with you and i did not say the student movements are not strong but, they can’t do it alone like before this time, things have changed in Sudan, the NIF/NCP don’t think or behave like an average Sudanese person and there ways are much more brutal and senseless. Therefore, the students will need the society to join them in huge number and here is the problem. People are still largely paralyzed by fear of the wrath of the NCP clan. These people need to overcome their fear before they can act positively, and this can only be done by continuing the resistance until more and more people start to join and when that happens, the regime will implode in itself automatically because of its hidden weaknesses (that’s not an easy job given the pathetic passive state the citizens of Sudan have reached through 22 years of oppression).

        Coming to your question about Islam, maybe the NCP represents Islam to you but not to us. My friend we are devote Muslims and we know what is Islam and this government represent a twisted version of intentionally misinterpreted Islam that is used to manipulate simple minded people which is not working now anyways because even the simplest of people discovered by themself that they are abusing the name of Islam. So, Islam is not the problem, the fear is the problem and continued demonstrations will gradually take away that fear.

        Peace

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