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Khartoum says oil deal with South Sudan depends on border security

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January 18, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – Sudan’s Foreign Minister Ali Karti on Wednesday said that an oil deal with South Sudan is unlikely to be reached in light of the latter’s support to insurgents in border areas.

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FILE - Sudan’s foreign minister Ali Karti

Sudan and South Sudan failed to resume their talks on oil as scheduled on Tuesday, 17 January, in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa despite efforts to the contrary by mediators of the African Union High Level Implementation Panel (AUHIP) led by former South African president Thabo Mbeki.

The collapse of the talks comes amid increased tension between the recently separated countries due to the absence of a deal on the transit fees that the land-locked South Sudan should pay for the use of Khartoum’s pipeline infrastructure to bring its oil to export terminals in Sudan’s red sea port.

Juba accused Khartoum of “stealing” its oil after the latter moved to confiscate portions of the southern oil shipped through its territories, claiming that Juba has not paid any fees since South Sudan seceded last year.

In an interview with Reuters, Karti said Khartoum would continue to confiscate what he termed as its right in southern oil as long as Juba remains unserious in reaching an agreement on transit fees.

"If they are not ready to sit down and conclude an agreement, we will take our right. We will take our entitlements," he said.

According to press reports, South Sudan demanded that its northern neighbor pay an equivalent of 1.4 million barrels of oil to resume talks.

"Nobody can hamper us from taking our right. This is our entitlement," Karti stressed.

Sudan’s oil-dependent economy has suffered a massive loss when South Sudan took with it 75 percent of its previous daily output of 500,000 barrels of oil when it seceded in July last year as per a 2005 peace deal that ended more than two decades of civil wars between the two sides.

According to Karti, South Sudan’s support for the rebels Sudan People’s Liberation Movement North (SPLM-N) in Sudan’s border states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile was hindering the talks.

SPLM-N rebels fought as part of the southern army during the war but they refused to disarm after the south seceded without a security arrangements deal, leading to the outbreak of the conflict in South Kordofan and Blue Nile last year. Juba denies Khartoum’s accusation that it is supporting the SPLM-N.

"If you are hosting rebels, preparing them against me, supporting them by munitions, by salaries, by everything, by training, by giving them all facilities. What shall I wait for? What shall I wait for you to do? I’m waiting for war," Karti said.

He further claimed that Khartoum had monitored conversations proving that Juba was supporting SPLM-N fighters.

"We listen to them. They know that we listen to them. What kind of stupidity? You know I’m listening to what you say every day, and you go on talking about salaries, ammunition, supporting us, and bringing more tanks near the borders, and the rest," he said.

The Sudanese minister opined that any oil agreement would be dependent on reaching a border security deal, including the marking of the borders.

"To me, it could be a holistic approach. A piecemeal way of doing things is not enough, and it proved not to be working. It’s better to begin with the top issues - the security issue to me is very important - and then the rest will be easy," he said.

Meanwhile in Khartoum, the official spokesman of Sudan’s Foreign Ministry Al-Obeid Marwih described Pagan’s accusation that Khartoum was stealing oil as an attempt to score political points.

He added that the negotiation atmosphere was not encouraging and urged AU mediators to pressure the south to return to the negotiation table.

Similarly, Sudan’s Oil Minister Awad al-Jaz rejected Juba’s accusation of stealing oil, saying his country was merely taking its rightful share.

He explained that Sudan had resorted to confiscating southern oil after Juba brushed aside the proposals Khartoum put forward since June on the fees per barrel.

Sudan wants South Sudan to pay $36 a barrel to use the export pipeline, a demand Juba terms as “broad daylight robbery”

“We have observed patience in the face of all the malpractices since the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement [CPA] and throughout its implementation, but unfortunately southerners are listening to others,” the Sudanese minister said in a hint at foreign influence on South Sudan.

Al-Jaz went on to criticize what he termed as South Sudan’s unresponsiveness to Khartoum’s proposals.

“We proposed a price for the barrel and we have never skipped any round of talks but we found no response from the other side” he said, warning that Khartoum’s patience has limits.

“We will not forsake our rights, and taking your rights is not a vice” the Sudanese minister said in reference to the south’s accusation of stealing.

(ST)

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  • 19 January 2012 09:11, by Xeno

    Karti
    Stealing is haram faggot....or your religion call it entitlements?. you are pathetic idiots.

    repondre message

  • 19 January 2012 09:12, by Lang

    “We proposed a price for the barrel and we have never skipped any round of talks but we found no response from the other side” he said, warning that Khartoum’s patience has limits.

    No matter how many times they ask for it the $36 per barrel will NEVER be accepted. Give it up terrorist it will never happen. GOSS should shut down the pipeline & let the ICC know about the oil theft :D

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    • 19 January 2012 09:41, by Dam Musa

      Mr. Karti, how long will you keep stealing South Sudan oil?
      If south decide to suspend exporting via Port Sudan pipe, where will you steal it again?
      I understand you NCP are fraustrated. Shame on you.

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      • 19 January 2012 10:00, by Sir. Nostalgic

        Jalabia,
        I can see all Arabs are fool otherwise you can not come in and talk like that. How can we stop SPLA/M-North from claiming their right now? They are right to fight for their freedom and they are right to rule Sudan. Can we stop them, then they can’t even accept our argument. Our oil is going to find a route soon and you arabs North will go nowhere with that pipeline. We will find solutio

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  • 19 January 2012 09:46, by wad balad

    You are absolutly right Mr.karti.Forget about peace with splm. From now on we deal with the SPLM in the following manner.

    1. Confiscate oil to take our fair share in transit fee’s.
    2. Deal Militarality with threats from SPLM by bombing rebel bases in S.sudan and support S.sudan rebels in a tit or tat move.
    3. Secure all border area’s including abeyi.

    repondre message

    • 19 January 2012 10:25, by Land-of-Cush

      Karti mention that they have rights to keep taking south sudan’s oil by force. This shouldn’t be taken any howly as a joke by commentators. Sudan bombs south sudan territory in several times and they even took Abyei by force; this time they take oil by force too that term by south sudan goverment as stealing. Now the question is, what next the south sudan goverment is waiting for?

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  • 19 January 2012 10:31, by zol aweer

    Kart is very stupid indeed, how can you call stealing as your right. There is no agreement reached yet on oil share and you call it your right, what if South Sudan close the pipe, where will you claim your share ?
    Aaaaaaah the regime is collapsing and they are frustrate with war in Nuba Mt and Blue Nile as well.
    Please leave power before SPLA-North shame you !
    SPLA/M oyeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee !!!

    repondre message

  • 19 January 2012 11:11, by Gabriel KK

    Your threat is clear, what we are waiting is the closure of the pipeline and possible alternatives from our Government.
    South Sudan Oyee.

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  • 19 January 2012 12:02, by the Voices of a losts

    plse cut the root/pipe line off, cut its off don’t be chicken talking too much can’t do nothing.

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  • 19 January 2012 13:07, by ABDALLA BIN ABDALLA

    GOSS IS NOT SERIOUS. IF YOU HAVE KNOWN A THIEF CATCH HIM. NORTH KNEW THAT IF THEY STEAL NOBODY WILL BE SERIOUS ABOUT IT AND THAT IS WHY THEY SAID, "WE ARE TAKING OUR SHARE." IN REALYY, CAN YOU STEAL STEAL PART OF YOUR OWN?

    CAN MR.KIIR, THE LORD MAYOR OF JUBA RISE UP AND FACE MR.BASHIR? GO AND TELL HIM "STOP STEALING SOUTH SUDAN OIL" YOU DON’T HAVE A SHARE IN IT AGAIN. IT IS MIND NOW NOT OURS.

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  • 19 January 2012 15:50, by Corrector

    This comment board is soo sad. Lacking diplomacy, reasonable thinking, rational thinking and downright selfish. we,we,we,we,we,we,our,our,our,our. No one cares about you or your stuff.. The Sudan just wants to make sure GOSS is not and has no intention on being a pest to sudan. and for the love of god get S.Sudan intelligent people to please step forward!

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  • 19 January 2012 16:15, by Kolong oo!

    By then south sudan would have had made national refineries to fuel local population and then begins finding other means of exporting her oil and avoid khartoum.

    repondre message

    • 19 January 2012 16:58, by Corrector

      sounds like a good idea, might be feasible if more oil reserves are found. assuming the french, Chinese, Indians, Malaysians, Japanese and Russians are wrong of course and turns out to be feasible exploitable oil reserves in s.sudan. A lot of people forget that.

      repondre message

  • 19 January 2012 16:24, by AAMA

    I just wonder what u guys where thinking when u voted 98% for separation ?

    I said this before on this forum, that when u separate, the NCP will choke u, unfortunately, u were to blinded by ur hate to everything northern that u didn’t foresee what was damn clear in front of u.
    Now, u just need to be men enough and shut the headache valve and damage the pipeline forever.

    repondre message

  • 19 January 2012 16:29, by AAMA

    Actually, this should be a blessing for u guys so that u don’t sleep on the oil and start to truly build ur country become the proud nation u crave to be.

    This is also better for Sudan as we need to close all the doors that can yield head ache.

    repondre message

    • 19 January 2012 18:49, by jong jong dog

      that is true AMaa,they either stop exporting oil through portsudan or pay reasonble transit fees.why did we quit our land to northeners and then crying over others property.

      repondre message

      • 20 January 2012 00:57, by allan

        Alan bard and his gay countpart Jalaby go fuck each another their since its arab culture and stay the fuck away from s sudan shit ,

        repondre message

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